History & Geography

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Islamic Civilization In Thirty Lives: The First 1000 YearsIslamic Civilization In Thirty Lives: The First 1000 Years by Robinson, Chase

The religious thinkers, political leaders, law-makers, writers and philosophers of the early Muslim world helped to shape the 1,400-year-long development of today's secondlargest world religion. But who were these people? What do we know of their lives, and the ways in which they influenced their societies? Chase F. Robinson draws on the long tradition in Muslim scholarship of commemorating in writing the biographies of notable figures, but weaves these ambitious lives together to create a rich narrative of early Islamic civilization, from the Prophet Muhammad to fearsome Tamerlane.

People's Constitutional Proposals For Malaya, The (70Th Anniversary Edition)People's Constitutional Proposals For Malaya, The (70Th Anniversary Edition) by Syed Husin Ali; A. Omar; J. Devaraj; F. Reza

Drafted by representativer of the Pusat Tenaga Ra'ayat (PUTERA) and the All-Malaya Council Of Joint Action (AMCJA) between the months of May and August, 1947; and approved by two Conferences of Delegates from the PUTERA and the AMCJA on July 4-7, and on August 10, 1947, together with a full exposition, and an analysis to the Government's Constitutional Proposals.

Faithful Record Of The Lisbon Maru Incident, AFaithful Record Of The Lisbon Maru Incident, A by Finch, Brian (Trans.)

This is a recent translation from an original Chinese publication covering an important chapter in Hong Kong's wartime history. It gives details of the Lisbon Maru Incident of 1942, seen through the eyes of the Chinese fishermen who rescued hundreds of British prisoners of war from Hong Kong, whose ship had been torpedoed. The Japanese had tried to keep them in the holds as the ship sank, and then shot at them as they tried to escape. These courageous fishermen not only prevented hundreds more deaths, they also hid three prisoners under the noses of the Japanese until they could be sent secretly on a journey across more than 1,000 miles of China to reach Chongqing, from where they could tell the world what had happened. The book also recounts the visit to Zhoushan in 2005 of one of the survivors of the sinking and his emotional reunion with those who saved him; as well as a visit to Hong Kong in the same year of the last few remaining fishermen who had taken part in the rescue.

Through American Eyes: The Journals Of George Washington (Farley) Heard 1837-1875Through American Eyes: The Journals Of George Washington (Farley) Heard 1837-1875 by Bickley, Gillian (Ed.)

Long ago secrets, lost emotions and persistent sadness at human conflict are finally revealed in this first publication of journals written by a young American visiting the Far East for the first time. Travelling out in 1859 to join his uncle's then successful trading house, Augustine Heard & Co., George was hired on shipboard by fellow-passenger John E. Ward, the American Minister tasked with the ratification of the American-Chinese treaty. As an attaché to the American Legation, George witnessed the June 1859 Battle of the Peiho, and in July 1860 - now promoted as Secretary of Legation - he saw the western Allies' preparations for the return battle that took place in August 1860. At least one of his letters home was borrowed to be copied by the American Minister and sent to the US President as an official report. These were early days in the intercourse between the United States and the Far East; a first Treaty with Japan (which George also visited and writes about here) had been agreed only a short time earlier. Some of the Chinese people whom George talked with in villages visited on the way to Beijing had never heard of his country. A cultured, charming and conscientious person, with a sense of humour, an early-developed cross-cultural perspective, and highly readable writing style, George W. Heard died unmarried in his late thirties, and was buried far from home. This book finally brings home his memorial.

How Language Began: The Story Of Humanity's Greatest InventionHow Language Began: The Story Of Humanity's Greatest Invention by Everett, Daniel L.

Mankind has a distinct advantage over other terrestrial species: we talk to one another. But how did we acquire the most advanced form of communication on Earth? This book provides a comprehensive examination of the evolutionary story of language, from the earliest speaking attempts by hominids to the more than seven thousand languages that exist today. Although fossil hunters and linguists have brought us closer to unearthing the true origins of language, Daniel Everett's discoveries have upended the contemporary linguistic world, reverberating far beyond academic circles.

Acm Treasures: Collection HighlightsAcm Treasures: Collection Highlights by Lingner, Richard; Clement Onn (Eds.)

ACM Treasures, a new collection highlights book from the Asian Civilisations Museum, follows the structure of museum's permanent galleries, with sections dedicated to Trade, Faith and Belief, and Materials and Design. Within each section, chapters mapping onto present and future gallery spaces present art objects from each gallery of the museum. The reader will find that many of the objects are cross-cultural, meaning that they are hybrid - "east-west" or "east-east" sorts of things - essentially mixed, just like Singapore and many of its resident. Nearly 200 objects in full colour , each with a short explanation, make this book a perfect gift or personal remembrance of a visit to the ACM.

Jean Marshall's Pahang Letters, 1953-54: Sidelights On Malaya During The EmergencyJean Marshall's Pahang Letters, 1953-54: Sidelights On Malaya During The Emergency by Arora, Mandakini (Ed.)

"Life generally is a bit hedged in with precautions at the moment," Jean Gray wrote, with characteristic understatement, to her parents in England. 27 years old, Jean was in rural Malaya working as a field officer with the British Red Cross for a year in 1953-54. At that time, Malaya was in a state of Emergency. Communist insurgents, using the jungle as cover, engaged in guerilla war against the colonial state. Under the Red Cross scheme, Jean was appointed to provide medical and welfare services in the New Villages - guarded settlements of villagers relocated from the jungle fringes in a government move to cut off aid to the militants. From west Pahang, where she was posted, Jean wrote weekly to her family and occasionally to her friends, sharing with them her impressions of Malaya and minutiae of her daily life and work while reassuring them that she was safe. These all-but-forgotten letters with accompanying photographs were rediscovered and returned to their sender after 60-odd years. As historical documents, they illuminate the social and professional world of a young and perceptive Englishwoman who was in small-town Malaya at a historically critical time - during the Malayan Emergency and the last days of empire.

Okinawa - The History Of An Island PeopleOkinawa - The History Of An Island People by Kerr, George

This is the definitive book available in English on the history of Okinawa and the Ryukyu Islands, and an influential scholarly work in the field of Japanese studies. Noted Eastern affairs specialist George Kerr recounts the fascinating history of the island and its environs, from 1314 A.D. to the late twentieth century. First published in 1958, this edition features an introduction and appendix by Okinawa history scholar Mitsugu Sakihara, making this the most comprehensive resource on the intriguing island of Okinawa.

(Re)Presenting Histories: Experiences And Perspectives From The National Museum Of Singapore(Re)Presenting Histories: Experiences And Perspectives From The National Museum Of Singapore by Yeo, Stephanie (Ed.)

In celebration of the nation's Golden Jubilee, the National Museum of Singapore re-opened in September 2015 after an extensive revamp of its permanent galleries. Featuring interactive, contextual displays and immersive experiences, the updated galleries seek to both represent and re-present Singapore's rich culture and history, and to encourage meaningful connections and conversations with its visitors. (Re)Presenting Histories is an intimate glimpse into the experiences and perspectives of the National Museum's curatorial team, as they undertook this ambitious project over the course of one year.

Mapping Cultural Nationalism: The Scholars Of The Burma Research Society, 1910-1935Mapping Cultural Nationalism: The Scholars Of The Burma Research Society, 1910-1935 by Boshier, Carol Ann

This detailed study of the Burma Research Society (founded in 1910 and flourishing until the 1930s), its membership and published output contextualizes the Society within its metropolitan and regional setting, as well as drawing on a broader, transnational intellectual landscape. This timely work on the Society's intellectual legacy has the potential to inform current debates in Myanmar at a time when the activities of ultra-nationalist groups threaten other religions and ethnicities' rights as citizens. The study will be of interest to historians and students of colonial Burma as well as anyone interested in the roots of the identity issues currently to the fore in Myanmar.

What's In The Name? How The Streets And Villages In Singapore Got Their NamesWhat's In The Name? How The Streets And Villages In Singapore Got Their Names by Ng Yew Peng

Since 1819, more than 6,200 place (street and village) names divided into more than 3,900 name groups were known in Singapore. Based on digitised historical newspapers, dated back to 1830, municipal records and Malay dictionaries, the origins, meanings and date of naming for many place names are uncovered. As part of Singapore history, place names known since 1936 are recorded in this book. This book is a complete listing of all place names since 1936, together with the most comprehensive annotations to date. It is also the only book of its kind in Singapore that analyses naming trends. Information on the origins or date of naming was based on primary sources such as old maps, minutes of municipal meetings, Chinese books and digitised newspapers.

History Of Timor-LesteHistory Of Timor-Leste by Durand, Frederic B.

The Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, a former Portuguese colony occupied by Indonesia from 1975 to 1999, became in 2002 the first new sovereign state of the twenty-first century. Its modern nationhood belies its ancient history. Archaeological data found on the island can be traced back at least 42,000 years, beyond most ancient European artifacts. The book provides a readable overview of the history of the country from the first traces of human habitation through Timor-Leste's hard-won independence in May 2002.

Bagan And The World: Early Myanmar And Its Global ConnectionsBagan And The World: Early Myanmar And Its Global Connections by Goh Geok Yian, John Miksic & M. Aung-Thwin (Eds.)

The archaeological site of Bagan and the kingdom which bore its name contains one of the greatest concentrations of ancient architecture and art in Asia. Much of what is visible today consists of ruins of Buddhist monasteries. While these monuments are a major tourist attraction, recent advances in archaeology and textual history have added considerable new understanding of this kingdom, which flourished between the 11th and 14th centuries. Bagan was not an isolated monastic site; its inhabitants participated actively in networks of Buddhist religious activity and commerce, abetted by the sites location near the junction where South Asia, China and Southeast Asia meet. This volume presents the result of recent research by scholars from around the world, including indigenous Myanmar people.

Project 0812: The Inside Story Of Singapore' S Journey To Olympic GloryProject 0812: The Inside Story Of Singapore' S Journey To Olympic Glory by Peh Shing Huei

In 2006, nearly 50 years after Singapore's first and only Olympic medal in 1960, a group of men decided to take a bold step. Led by International Olympic Committee member Ng Ser Miang, the team made a move which had never been attempted by Singapore before. They decided to fund, support and energise Singapore sport's attempt to win an Olympic medal. They called their experiment Project 0812 - a push for Singapore to score a medal at either the 2008 Beijing Olympics or 2012 London Olympics or, better yet, both. The first section of this book covers the genesis of the scheme. The second section looks at the four sports chosen by Project 0812 - table tennis, badminton, sailing and shooting - and how they overcame challenges to reach Beijing 2008. The third section focuses on the Singapore table tennis team, the stars of the Project 0812. It digs deep into the struggles which bedeviled the team in the lead-up to Beijing, the drama on the way to winning a silver and the equally colourful aftermath. In the epilogue, the exploits of Team Singapore at the Rio 2016 Olympics are discussed, the latest page in the legacy of Project 0812. The book was written through some 30 interviews with officials, coaches and athletes. It also relied heavily on books, newspapers and magazines, and even monthly reports submitted by the national sports associations, minutes of meetings held by Project 0812 and internal reports of SNOC. It is a story of courage and dreams, of deep-seated desire to bring Olympic glory to a small country.

Royal Navy In Eastern Waters, The: Linchpin Of Victory, 1935-1942Royal Navy In Eastern Waters, The: Linchpin Of Victory, 1935-1942 by Boyd, Andrew

The British Royal Navy has been sharply criticized for tactical errors in Asia during the years leading to WWII. In particular, the deployment of the Repulse and the Prince of Wales, and their catastrophic loss, has been characterized as part of a flawed and ineffective strategy. Andrew Boyd argues that the loss of these warships has overshadowed the RN's broader success in securing control of the Indian Ocean. The book moves authoritatively between grand strategy, intelligence, accounts of specific operations, and technical assessment of ships and weapons. It effectively challenges established views of the RN's capabilities and performance, and will change understandings of Britain's role in the early years of the war.

Historical Imagination And Cultural Responses To Colonialism And NationalismHistorical Imagination And Cultural Responses To Colonialism And Nationalism by Azhar Ibrahim

History conditions the way that society discusses its problems. Treating history as a form of 'imagination', Azhar Ibrahim invites readers to probe the colonialist and nationalist tampering, suppression, and distortion of narratives on the Malays. In this thought-provoking book, the author encourages contemporary historians to move beyond the practice of Orientalist scholars: collecting data and describing facts. Instead, he promotes an alternative reading of history, one that departs from mainstream versions. Reflecting a strong understanding of classical Malay texts, the author also touches on broad themes such as psychological feudalism, orientalism, and the contestation of nationalist and colonialist perspectives on the community. Azhar's book is a welcomed contribution and a must-read for those interested in alternative discourses in Malay Studies.

Singapore Indian HeritageSingapore Indian Heritage by Rajesh Rai & A Mani (Eds.)

Singapore Indian Heritage is the Indian Heritage Centre's first publication since the centre's opening in 2015. It comprises essays by respected scholars and IHC's curators on different aspects of Indian heritage, as told through the centre's permanent galleries as well as catalogue entries featuring the centre's collection of over 300 artefacts, photographs and documents. Edited by Professors Rajesh Rai and A Mani, the publication is an important addition to the compilation of writings on Singapore's Indian community, and in particular on the community's cultural heritage.

Hong Kong 20/20: Reflections On A Borrowed PlaceHong Kong 20/20: Reflections On A Borrowed Place by Ho, Tammy

The handover in 1997 saw Hong Kong's smooth transition from colonial to Communist rule under the auspices of the 'one country, two systems' framework. But twenty years on, the real impact of the sovereignty change is just starting to register: the city's near-total economic integration with the mainland, a massive influx of Chinese visitors, simmering cross-border tensions and a rapid erosion of freedoms. Believing that we are stronger and louder together, PEN Hong Kong invited some of Hong Kong's most prominent literary and creative minds to reflect on the city's post-colonial development, in a definitive compendium of essays, poems, fiction and artwork that marks this historical milestone.

Hong Kong On The Brink: An American Diplomat Relives 1967'S Darkest DaysHong Kong On The Brink: An American Diplomat Relives 1967'S Darkest Days by Goldsmith, Syd

Syd Goldsmith's first taste of China's Cultural Revolution is blood on his tongue. It's 1967. Hong Kong is simmering, plagued by communist-led riots and strikes, crippled transport, punishing water-rationing, takeover threats from Beijing and roadside bombs. And Syd -- the only Caucasian Foreign Service Officer at the American Consulate General who speaks Cantonese -- is made responsible for reporting and analysis of the Hong Kong government's ability to survive. The CIA station chief and the head of Macau's gold syndicate play major roles in Syd's story, along with Newsweek's Sydney Liu and Maynard Parker, and a steady stream of inquiring foreign correspondents and China-watchers. Richard Nixon makes a cameo appearance -- to talk football with Syd since the consul general won't see him -- in this riveting memoir of a year when Hong Kong's "borrowed time" seemed about to expire.

Policing Hong Kong - An Irish History: Irishmen In The Hong Kong Police Force, 1864-1950Policing Hong Kong - An Irish History: Irishmen In The Hong Kong Police Force, 1864-1950 by O'sullivan, Patricia

Hong Kong, 1918. A tranquil place compared to war-torn Europe. But on the morning of the 22nd January, a running battle through the streets of Wanchai ended in "The Siege of Gresson Street". Five policemen lay dead, so shocking Hong Kong that over half the population turned out to watch their funeral procession. One of the dead, Inspector Mortimor O'Sullivan, came from Newmarket: a small town nestled deep in rural Ireland. He, along with a dozen and more relatives, had sailed out to Hong Kong to join the Police Force. Using family records and memories alongside extensive research in Hong Kong, Ireland and London, Patricia O'Sullivan tells the story of these policemen and the criminals they dealt with. This book also gives a rare glimpse into the day-to-day life of working-class Europeans at the time, as it follows the Newmarket men, their wives and families, from their first arrival in 1864 through to 1941 and beyond.