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Singapore Indian HeritageSingapore Indian Heritage by Rajesh Rai & A Mani (Eds.)

Singapore Indian Heritage is the Indian Heritage Centre's first publication since the centre's opening in 2015. It comprises essays by respected scholars and IHC's curators on different aspects of Indian heritage, as told through the centre's permanent galleries as well as catalogue entries featuring the centre's collection of over 300 artefacts, photographs and documents. Edited by Professors Rajesh Rai and A Mani, the publication is an important addition to the compilation of writings on Singapore's Indian community, and in particular on the community's cultural heritage.

Hong Kong 20/20: Reflections On A Borrowed PlaceHong Kong 20/20: Reflections On A Borrowed Place by Ho, Tammy

The handover in 1997 saw Hong Kong's smooth transition from colonial to Communist rule under the auspices of the 'one country, two systems' framework. But twenty years on, the real impact of the sovereignty change is just starting to register: the city's near-total economic integration with the mainland, a massive influx of Chinese visitors, simmering cross-border tensions and a rapid erosion of freedoms. Believing that we are stronger and louder together, PEN Hong Kong invited some of Hong Kong's most prominent literary and creative minds to reflect on the city's post-colonial development, in a definitive compendium of essays, poems, fiction and artwork that marks this historical milestone.

Hong Kong On The Brink: An American Diplomat Relives 1967'S Darkest DaysHong Kong On The Brink: An American Diplomat Relives 1967'S Darkest Days by Goldsmith, Syd

Syd Goldsmith's first taste of China's Cultural Revolution is blood on his tongue. It's 1967. Hong Kong is simmering, plagued by communist-led riots and strikes, crippled transport, punishing water-rationing, takeover threats from Beijing and roadside bombs. And Syd -- the only Caucasian Foreign Service Officer at the American Consulate General who speaks Cantonese -- is made responsible for reporting and analysis of the Hong Kong government's ability to survive. The CIA station chief and the head of Macau's gold syndicate play major roles in Syd's story, along with Newsweek's Sydney Liu and Maynard Parker, and a steady stream of inquiring foreign correspondents and China-watchers. Richard Nixon makes a cameo appearance -- to talk football with Syd since the consul general won't see him -- in this riveting memoir of a year when Hong Kong's "borrowed time" seemed about to expire.

Policing Hong Kong - An Irish History: Irishmen In The Hong Kong Police Force, 1864-1950Policing Hong Kong - An Irish History: Irishmen In The Hong Kong Police Force, 1864-1950 by O'sullivan, Patricia

Hong Kong, 1918. A tranquil place compared to war-torn Europe. But on the morning of the 22nd January, a running battle through the streets of Wanchai ended in "The Siege of Gresson Street". Five policemen lay dead, so shocking Hong Kong that over half the population turned out to watch their funeral procession. One of the dead, Inspector Mortimor O'Sullivan, came from Newmarket: a small town nestled deep in rural Ireland. He, along with a dozen and more relatives, had sailed out to Hong Kong to join the Police Force. Using family records and memories alongside extensive research in Hong Kong, Ireland and London, Patricia O'Sullivan tells the story of these policemen and the criminals they dealt with. This book also gives a rare glimpse into the day-to-day life of working-class Europeans at the time, as it follows the Newmarket men, their wives and families, from their first arrival in 1864 through to 1941 and beyond.

Singapore Chronicles: Pre-Colonial SingaporeSingapore Chronicles: Pre-Colonial Singapore by Kwa Chong Guan

The conventional and dominant view of Singapore's history is that it began with Stamford Raffles' arrival on the island in January 1819, and that nothing of significance, if at all anything, happened on this island before that. This book attempts a re-examination of the existing evidence in conjunction with excavated archaeological evidence and Portuguese and Dutch archival records to argue that there were significant developments on and around the island. They shaped Singapore's historical development after 1819 and could alter our understanding of what Singapore is about in history.

First Islanders: Prehistory And Human Migration In Island Southeast AsiaFirst Islanders: Prehistory And Human Migration In Island Southeast Asia by Bellwood, Peter

Incorporating research findings over the last twenty years, First Islanders examines the human prehistory of Island Southeast Asia. This fascinating story is explored from a broad swathe of multidisciplinary perspectives and pays close attention to migration in the period dating from 1.5 million years ago to the development of Indic kingdoms late in the first millennium CE.

Short History Of South-East Asia, AShort History Of South-East Asia, A by Church, Peter

This is the latest in a series of updated texts spotlighting this fascinating region. With revised chapters for all of the countries in this geographic area, this interesting text paints a remarkable overview of the characters and events that have shaped this part of the world. With an approachable writing style and comprehensive content, this unique text was written for business readers interested in improving their understanding of this important region.

Taming Babel: Language In The Making Of MalaysiaTaming Babel: Language In The Making Of Malaysia by Leow, Rachel

Taming Babel sheds new light on the role of language in the making of modern postcolonial Asian nations. Focusing on one of the most linguistically diverse territories in the British Empire, Rachel Leow explores the profound anxieties generated by a century of struggles to govern the polyglot subjects of British Malaya and postcolonial Malaysia. The book ranges across a series of key moments in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, in which British and Asian actors wrought quiet battles in the realm of language: in textbooks and language classrooms; in dictionaries, grammars and orthographies; in propaganda and psychological warfare; and in the very planning of language itself. Every attempt to tame Chinese and Malay languages resulted in failures of translation, competence, and governance, exposing both the deep fragility of a monoglot state in polyglot milieux, and the essential untameable nature of languages in motion.

Rice: Global Networks And New HistoriesRice: Global Networks And New Histories by Bray, Francesca; Peter A. Coclanis Et Al (Eds.)

Rice today is food to half the world's population. Its history is inextricably entangled with the emergence of colonialism, the global networks of industrial capitalism, and the modern world economy. The history of rice is currently a vital and innovative field of research attracting serious attention, but no attempt has yet been made to write a history of rice and its place in the rise of capitalism from a global and comparative perspective. Rice is a first step toward such a history. The fifteen chapters, written by specialists on Africa, the Americas, and Asia, are premised on the utility of a truly international approach to history. Each brings a new approach that unsettles prevailing narratives and suggests new connections. Together they cast new light on the significant roles of rice as crop, food, and commodity, and shape historical trajectories and interregional linkages in Africa, the Americas, Europe, and Asia.

Conflict And Commerce In Maritime East Asia: The Zheng Family And The Shaping Of The Modern World, C. 1620-1720Conflict And Commerce In Maritime East Asia: The Zheng Family And The Shaping Of The Modern World, C. 1620-1720 by Xing Hang

The Zheng family of merchants and militarists emerged from the tumultuous seventeenth century amid a severe economic depression, a harrowing dynastic transition from the ethnic Chinese Ming to the Manchu Qing, and the first wave of European expansion into East Asia. Under four generations of leaders over six decades, the Zheng had come to dominate trade across the China Seas. Their average annual earnings matched, and at times exceeded, those of their fiercest rivals: the Dutch East India Company. Although nominally loyal to the Ming in its doomed struggle against the Manchus, the Zheng eventually forged an autonomous territorial state based on Taiwan with the potential to encompass the family's entire economic sphere of influence. Through the story of the Zheng, Xing Hang provides a fresh perspective on the economic divergence of early modern China from western Europe, its twenty-first-century resurgence, and the meaning of a Chinese identity outside China.

Ming China And Vietnam: Negotiating Borders In Early Modern AsiaMing China And Vietnam: Negotiating Borders In Early Modern Asia by Baldanza, Kathlene

Studies of Sino-Viet relations have traditionally focused on Chinese aggression and Vietnamese resistance, or have assumed out-of-date ideas about Sinicization and the tributary system. They have limited themselves to national historical traditions, doing little to reach beyond the border. Ming China and Vietnam, by contrast, relies on sources and viewpoints from both sides of the border, for a truly transnational history of Sino-Viet relations. Kathlene Baldanza offers a detailed examination of geopolitical and cultural relations between Ming China (1368-1644) and Dai Viet, the state that would go on to become Vietnam. She highlights the internal debates and external alliances that characterized their diplomatic and military relations in the pre-modern period, showing especially that Vietnamese patronage of East Asian classical culture posed an ideological threat to Chinese states. Baldanza presents an analysis of seven linked biographies of Chinese and Vietnamese border-crossers whose lives illustrate the entangled histories of those countries.

World War One In Southeast Asia: Colonialism And Anticolonialism In An Era Of Global ConflictWorld War One In Southeast Asia: Colonialism And Anticolonialism In An Era Of Global Conflict by Streets-Salter, Helen

Although not a major player during the course of the First World War, Southeast Asia was in fact altered by the war in multiple and profound ways. Ranging across British Malaya, the Dutch East Indies, and French Indochina, Heather Streets-Salter reveals how the war shaped the region's political, economic, and social development both during 1914-18 and in the war's aftermath. She shows how the region's strategic location between North America and India made it a convenient way-station for expatriate Indian revolutionaries who hoped to smuggle arms and people into India and thus to overthrow British rule, whilst German consuls and agents entered into partnerships with both Indian and Vietnamese revolutionaries to undermine Allied authority and coordinate anti-British and anti-French operations.

Entangled Landscapes: Early Modern China And EuropeEntangled Landscapes: Early Modern China And Europe by Yue Zhuang & Andrea M. Riemenschnitter

Entangled Landscapes focuses on the exchange of ideas of landscape practice between Europe and China in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Yue Zhuang and Andrea M. Riemenschnitter explore this through three themes - empire-building, mediators' constraints, and aesthetic negotiations. They challenge our assumptions about how China and Europe influenced one another and go beyond well-documented outcomes like the jardin anglo-chinois and Europeenerie styles. Interdisciplinary and revisionist, this brings the critical spirit of postcolonial studies to art history and will appeal to scholars in fields such as comparative literature and visual culture, history, and human geography.

Reporting The Retreat: War Correspondents In Burma, 1942Reporting The Retreat: War Correspondents In Burma, 1942 by Woods, Philip

Japan's invasion of Burma in 1942 set off the longest retreat in British military history. Along with the fall of Singapore, it marked the beginning of the end of British rule, not only in Burma but also in south and south-east Asia. Britain's defeat in Burma has been studied in detail, but Reporting the Retreat is the first account that looks at how war correspondents presented the campaign in Western newspapers, pictorial magazines, and newsreels. Using wartime archives, Philip Woods re-evaluates the accuracy and impact of the versions of events presented by war correspondents reporting from Burma. His account will be of great value to historians of conflict and to anyone interested in journalism and the media.

Syonan: Singapore Under The Japanese 1942-1945Syonan: Singapore Under The Japanese 1942-1945 by Lee Geok Boi

To the generation of Singapore residents who lived through the Japanese Occupation, it was not at all clear that they were experiencing a turning point in their history. The period, to them, was about the brutality of Japanese military administration, of deprivation and about fear of the future. Most were unaware that Japan's victory marked the sunset of British rule in the region. This revised edition of Syonan: Singapore Under the Japanese 1942-1945, with extensively revised text and newly researched illustrations, frames the social memories of Singapore in the perspectives of war, surrender, suffering and legacy to present a vivid picture of how a people arose from ruin to take charge of their destiny.

Lions And Tigers: Story Of Football In Singapore And MalaysiaLions And Tigers: Story Of Football In Singapore And Malaysia by Duerden, John

Veteran football correspondent John Duerden explores one of the world's big rivalries in the world of football - that between Singapore and Malaysia, and what it means for both nations. It won't be just about the big games but about players from one country that played in another and the recent sojourn of Lions XII in Malaysia and Harimau Muda in the S-League. From meetings between the two national teams and clubs to tales from the times when they both sent teams to compete in the other's league, Lions and Tigers describes how Singapore and Malaysia feel about each other and how it all looks to an outsider between the two countries with comments from both nations - from coaches, players and key stakeholders, and also journalists and fans of the beautiful game.

William Farquhar And Singapore: Stepping Out From Raffles' ShadowWilliam Farquhar And Singapore: Stepping Out From Raffles' Shadow by Wright, Nadia H.

When the achievements of great individuals are exaggerated, an enormous shadow is cast over the work of their subordinates. This has been the case in accounts of the founding of the British settlement at Singapore in 1819 - in which Sir Stamford Raffles has been aggrandised at the expense of Major General William Farquhar. Venerated by contemporary Bugis, Chinese and Indians for his character and accomplishments, Farquhar maintained that he was largely responsible for Singapore's rapid growth and commercial success. But his claims have been obscured for the most part by the glori?cation of Raffles. In this groundbreaking and carefully documented study, Nadia Wright re-examines East India Company records and other historical documents to offer a fresh analysis of the roles of Raffles and Farquhar in Singapore's founding and early development. William Farquhar and Singapore reveals new and sometimes startling insights into the achievements and personalities of both men, and explains why Farquhar has been overlooked for so long.

Nagasaki: Life After Nuclear WarNagasaki: Life After Nuclear War by Southard, Susan

The two atomic bombs marked the end of a global war, but for the tens of thousands of survivors it was the beginning of a new life marked with the stigma of being hibakusha (atomic bomb-affected people). Susan Southard has spent a decade interviewing and researching the lives of the hibakusha and their raw, emotive eye-witness accounts. Following five teenage survivors from 1945 to the present day, Southard unveils the lives they have led, their injuries in the annihilation of the bomb, the dozens of radiation-related cancers and illnesses they have suffered and the humiliating and frightening choices about marriage they were forced into as a result of their fears of the genetic diseases that may be passed through their families for generations to come.

Water Kingdom, The: A Secret History Of ChinaWater Kingdom, The: A Secret History Of China by Ball, Philip

Selected as a Book of the Year by The Times and The Economist. China's history is an epic tapestry of courtly philosophies, warring factions and imperial intrigue. Yet, over five thousand years, one ancient element has so dramatically shaped the country's fate that it remains the key to unlocking China's story. That element is water. In The Water Kingdom Philip Ball takes us on a grand tour of China's defining element, from the rice terraces and towering karts of its battle-worn waterways, to the vast engineering projects that have struggled to contain water's wrath. What surfaces is the secret history of a people and a nation, drawn from its deep reverence for nature's most dynamic force.

Story Of Lky, The - Lee Kuan Yew: Road To IndependenceStory Of Lky, The - Lee Kuan Yew: Road To Independence by Yoshio Nabeta; Toshiki Takii (Illus.)

World War II had ended, and Singapore is back under British rule. Having completed his studies, Lee Kuan Yew returns home to a nation that is ready for change. But will rising communist activities hurt Singapore's chances for a merger with Malaya? With renewed resolve, the fight for Singapore's Independence begins!