History & Geography

Featured Titles
Three Women Of Annam: Womanhood In 1920S Vietnam by Chivas-Baron, Clothilde

Three Women of Annam. Womanhood in 1920s Vietnam was written by a French feminist of the early hours. She tells the story of three local women, contrasting their destinies as they belonged to different social strata. They are the daughter of a high-placed official called against her will to the imperial palace, a peasant woman ending in a city sweatshop due to the usury of a Chinese shop-keeper, and a so-called congaie, an indigenous woman in consecutive relationships with French colonial officials. The last of these women lives the most precarious, although intermittently rich, life. In status barely beyond life on the streets as a prostitute, she often has mixed-breed offspring that suffer a discrimination that perpetuates the near-abhorence of Asians for the foreign devils. The migrant to the city is tempted by the luxury associated with being a Frenchman's local wife. The noble woman's life, while in appearance the least difficult, has its own problems as a satisfactory emotional life escapes her in the face of absolute power. Prominent is the inner debate women have to conduct when confronted with the possibility of joining French wealth in the face of their own Annamese poverty. The destinies are plotted into timeless love-stories, happy-end included. In passing, the author offers glimpses of the daily life of French colonials, colonial delights such as opium, the pervasive role of Vietnamese ancestor worship, the stigma of a childless marriage, second wives, and the populace's fears and superstitions, in a Vietnam occupied by the French.

Economic Conditions Of North-Eastern Siam (1929) by Ministry Of Commerce And Communications

The Economic Conditions of North-Eastern Siam is the report of the first economic survey of Isan, conducted by Reginald Stuart Le May in 1929. Prior to 1929, not much was known of neglected Northeast Siam, previously called Laos. The population, almost 4 million, 1/3rd of the Kingdom's, was primarily ethnically Lao and Khmer. Le May's work, the result of provincial-level questionnaires, provides foundational knowledge of the contours of economic life in this neglected region just as Siam's 1932 constitutional revolution took place. Leedom Lefferts wrote the introduction and compares the work with Carle C. Zimmermann's Siam: Rural Economic Survey 1930-1931 (Available as a White Lotus Press reprint).

Views From Pulau Pinang: Countering Modern Orientalism And Policy PerspectivesViews From Pulau Pinang: Countering Modern Orientalism And Policy Perspectives by Ahmad Murad Merican; Azeem Fazwan Ahmad Farouk

Views from Pulau Pinang brings together the writings of members of the Centre for Policy Research and International Studies, Universiti Sains Malaysia, with the aim of providing critical and alternative perspectives at the nexus between academia and policy discourse. Relating back to the history and intellectual traditions of Pulau Pinang it seeks to situate themes of knowledge production and social science research within a geographic space which has itself long been subject to forces of orientalism, colonisation, modernisation, developmentalism, globalisation, nationalism and intellectual captivity, but also forces of decolonisation, anti-orientalism and localism. It explores these forces in the context of nation-building, development and education, calling for new approaches to urbanization and the relationship between the city and kampung, the university system and the digital revolution, and the nation-state and governance.

Red Star Over The Third WorldRed Star Over The Third World by Prashad, Vijay

From Cuba to Vietnam, from China to South Africa, the October Revolution remains as an inspiration. After all, that Revolution proved that the working class and the peasantry could not only overthrow an autocratic government but that it could form its own government, in its image. It proved decisively that the working class and the peasantry could be allied. It proved as well the necessity of a vanguard party that was open to spontaneous currents of unrest, but which could guide a revolution to completion. This book explains the power of the October Revolution for the Third World. It is not a comprehensive study, but a small book with a large hope - that a new generation will come to see the importance of this revolution for the working class and peasantry in that part of the world that suffered under the heel of colonial domination.

Nanyang: Essays On HeritageNanyang: Essays On Heritage by Wang Gungwu

This volume is a book of reflections and encounters about the region that the Chinese knew as Nanyang. The essays in it look back at the years of uncertainty after the end of World War II and explore the period largely through images of mixed heritages in Malaysia and Singapore. They also look at the trends towards social and political divisiveness following the years of decolonization in Southeast Asia. Never far in the background is the struggle to build new nations during four decades of an ideological Cold War and the Chinese determination to move from near-collapse in the 1940s and out of the traumatic changes of the Maoist revolution to become the powerhouse that it now is.

Ancient World In Minutes: The History And Achievements Of The First Great CivilizationsAncient World In Minutes: The History And Achievements Of The First Great Civilizations by Philips, Charles

Clear, concise yet wide-ranging, The Ancient World in Minutes is the quickest way to understand the great civilizations of the distant past. From the first-ever cities of Sumeria and Babylon around 3500 BCE to the fall of Rome and the bloody demise of the Aztecs, here - in 200 mini-essays - are the critical leaders and wars; ideas and inventions; myths and religions; and art and architecture of the first 5000 years of recorded history. Contents include Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, Ancient India, Ancient China, The Persian Empire, Classic Greece, The Roman Republic, the Maya, The Inca and many more.

Angkor: Exploring Cambodia's Sacred CityAngkor: Exploring Cambodia's Sacred City by Mccullough, Theresa; S. Murphy Et Al

This catalogue aimed at the general reader accompanies the exhibition Angkor: Exploring Cambodia's Sacred City. Full-colour images and write-ups of all objects in the show, along with essays on a range of topics including pre-Angkorian cities, the 19th-century French exploratory missions, display of Cambodian culture and objects back in France, and the styles of Khmer sculpture enhance the experience of the show.

Traces Of The Ramayana And Mahabharata In Javanese And Malay LiteratureTraces Of The Ramayana And Mahabharata In Javanese And Malay Literature by Ding Choo Ming & Willem Van Der Molen (Eds.)

Local renderings of the two Indian epics Ramayana and Mahabharata in Malay and Javanese literature have existed since around the ninth and tenth centuries. In the following centuries new versions were created alongside the old ones, and these opened up interesting new directions. They questioned the views of previous versions and laid different accents, in a continuous process of modernization and adaptation, successfully satisfying the curiosity of their audiences for more than a thousand years. Much of this history is still unclear. For a long time, scholarly research made little progress, due to its preoccupation with problems of origin. The present volume, going beyond identifying sources, analyses the socio-literary contexts and ideological foundations of seemingly similar contents and concepts in different periods; it examines the literary functions of borrowing and intertextual referencing, and calls upon the visual arts to illustrate the independent character of the epic tradition in Southeast Asia.

China Mission, The: George Marshall's Unfinished War, 1945-1947China Mission, The: George Marshall's Unfinished War, 1945-1947 by Kurtz-Phelan, Daniel

A nuanced history of the doomed diplomatic mission that turned the tides of the Chinese Civil War. Following the success of George C. Marshall's leadership of the American army during the Second World War, he was the obvious candidate for the international mission to broker a coalition government between China's warring Nationalists and Communists. As a US "special representative" Marshall began enacting miraculous change and under his guiding hand, China's political factions agreed to a ceasefire and settled on the principles of a democratic government. But then the agreements Marshall brokered fractured and civil war came to China. This fascinating history portrays the incredible beginnings and ultimate failure of Marshall's high-stakes mission. In spellbinding detail, it chronicles an unforgettable miss-step in American diplomacy that changed the course of global politics for ever more.

Sun Tzu: The Art Of WarSun Tzu: The Art Of War by Sun Tzu

Written over two thousand years ago, The Art of War contains penetrating insights into the nature of power, inter-state rivalry, realpolitik and military success, relevant to any age. It was first translated into English in the early 20th century. Sun Tzu's short lines of argument and pithy aphorisms are highly accessible to modern readers, and his text has almost achieved cult status. Sun Tzu's advice is shrewd and pragmatic - he does not glory in slaughter and prefers to win battles off the battlefield if possible; he is a strong supporter of the use of deception, of varying your shots and above all, of doing your research: knowing your enemy is key; but of little use if you do not also 'know yourself'.

Exhibiting The Fall Of Singapore: Close Readings Of A Global EventExhibiting The Fall Of Singapore: Close Readings Of A Global Event by Schumacher, Daniel; Stephanie Yeo (Eds.)

In September 2017, the National Museum of Singapore launched Witness to War: Remembering 1942, a special international exhibition to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the fall of Singapore. In conjunction with Witness to War, an international conference - Exhibiting the Fall: Remembering and Representing War and Its Aftermath in Asia - was held at the museum on 4 & 5 September 2017. The conference brought international academics and museum practitioners together in conversation about the ways in which Asia's violent mid-20th-century history is understood and represented. It was co-organised with the War Memoryscapes in Asia Partnership, an international, interdisciplinary network of academic specialists funded by the Leverhulme Trust. This publication is a collection of papers presented at the conference.

People's History Of Malaysia, A: With Emphasis On The Development Of NationalismPeople's History Of Malaysia, A: With Emphasis On The Development Of Nationalism by Syed Husin Ali

This book presents a brief people's history of Malaysia (formerly Malaya). Its approach is different from that which is often regarded as Official History because it focuses upon the process of making history from below, through the contribution of everyday people to the history of Malaya and Malaysia, and is written in a popular and not academic style. In focusing on the contribution of the people to the making of history, this book chronicles the development of nationalism and the rise of mass-based politics and people's independence movements alongside movements related to workers, women, students and indigenous peoples in the formation of a Malaysian nation state.

Records, Recoveries, Remnants And Inter-Asian Interconnections: Decoding Cultural HeritageRecords, Recoveries, Remnants And Inter-Asian Interconnections: Decoding Cultural Heritage by Anjana Sharma (Ed.)

This volume has at its conceptual core the inter-regional networks of Nalanda Mahavihara and its unique place in the Asian imaginary. The revival of Nalanda university in 2010 as a symbol of a shared inter-Asian heritage is this collection's core narrative. The multidisciplinary essays interrogate ways in which ideas, objects, texts, and travellers have shaped - and in turn have been shaped by - changing global politics and the historical imperative that underpins them. The question of what constitutes cultural authenticity and heritage valuation is inscribed from positions that support, negate, or reframe existing discourses with reference to Southeast and East Asia. The essays in this collection offer critical, scholarly, and nuanced views on the vexed questions of regional and inter-regional dynamics, of racial politics and their flattening hegemonic discourses in relation to the rich tangible and intangible heritage that defines an interconnected Asia.

Pulp: A Short Biography Of The Banished Book (Volume I Of V) by Rao, Shubigi

Since 2013 Shubigi Rao has been working on 'Pulp: A Short Biography of the Banished Book', a decade -long film, book and visual art project about the history of book destruction, censorship and other forms of repression, as well as the book as a symbol of resistance. This involves visiting public and private collections, libraries and archives globally that served as flashpoints in history, collecting fragments, ephemera, anecdotes, buried secrets and piecing together (through the film, book and artworks) a composite chronology of the conjoined literary and violent trajectories of our species. This is the first volume of five, released in January 2016. The remaining four volumes will be published every two years.

NigeriaNigeria by

Known as the African Giant, Nigeria's story is complex and often contradictory. How, despite the ravages of colonialism, civil war, ongoing economic disappointment and most recently the Boko Haram insurgency, has the country managed to stay together for a hundred years? Why, despite an abundance of oil, mineral and agricultural wealth, have so many of its people remained in poverty? These are the key questions explored by Richard Bourne in this remarkable and wide-ranging account of Nigeria's history, from its creation in 1914 to the historic 2015 elections and beyond.

Sutan Puasa, Founder Of Kuala LumpurSutan Puasa, Founder Of Kuala Lumpur by Abdur-Razzaq Lubis

Who was the founder of Kuala Lumpur, the capital city of Malaysia? Textbook history credits the Bugis chief of Klang, Raja Abdullah, while the Chinese regard the third Kapitan China, Yap Ah Loy, as the legendary founder. But closer examination reveals that the founding myths of Kuala Lumpur have omitted the earliest chapter of the city's history. 'Pangkalan Lumpur' was a Mandailing trading post at the confluence of the Klang and Gombak rivers, controlling the land and river routes of the upper Klang valley. Due to the visionary leadership of Sutan Puasa, it developed into a multicultural town, attracting Sumatran and Hakka Chinese miners and traders. Later, war destruction, disorder and debt paved the way for British colonial intervention into Selangor in 1874. Kuala Lumpur's strategic location as the trading hub of a rich tin mining interior destined it to become the capital - first, of Selangor, then of the Federated Malay States, and finally, of Malaysia itself.

Unsung Patriot: Memoirs Of Wong Pow NeeUnsung Patriot: Memoirs Of Wong Pow Nee by Wong Tet Phin, Peter; Koay Su Lyn

Unsung Patriot: Memoirs of Wong Pow Nee is a record of Pow Nee's impeccable journey in writing national history - rising from humble beginnings as a farmer and school teacher to public office as the first Chief Minister of Penang from 1957 to 1969. Apart from rare insights and accounts of Pow Nee's early services and personal life, this book seeks to fill in the gaps of Penang's post-independence developmental history, while highlighting Pow Nee's personal struggles and major contributions during his turbulent tenure as Chief Minister.

Contest For North Sumatra, The: Aceh, The Netherlands And Britain, 1858-1898Contest For North Sumatra, The: Aceh, The Netherlands And Britain, 1858-1898 by Reid, Anthony

Aceh and North Sumatra have the double distinction of being both one of the few places in the Archipelago that were left virtually untouched by Indian influence in pre-Islamic times and also of being an important base for Arab and Indian traders who, inter alia, initiated the spread of Islam in the area. That history of independence meant it was one of the last areas over which the Dutch were able to exert their control. Here, in a recently revised edition of his 1989 work, Anthony Reid, traces the history of increasing Dutch influence and the efforts of the British, based in the Straits Settlements, to thwart it.

Punji Trap - Pham Xuan An: The Spy Who Didn't Love Us by Hunt, Luke

Pham Xuan An was a Communist agent whose espionage adventures - under the cover story of a celebrated war correspondent in the Western Media - were as brilliant for Hanoi as they were shattering for Washington during the tumultuous days of the Vietnam War. He has been dubbed "the perfect spy" and affectionately referred to by some as "the spy who loved us". Not quite. Journalist and Southeast Asian specialist Luke Hunt prises this story open. He knew and interviewed An for many years, along with many friends and colleagues in journalism who knew him best in war, on the journalistic beat and amid the collapse of South Vietnam.

Iran: A Modern HistoryIran: A Modern History by Abbas Amanat

This history of modern Iran is not a survey in the conventional sense but an ambitious exploration of the story of a nation. It offers a revealing look at how events, people, and institutions are shaped by currents that sometimes reach back hundreds of years. The book covers the complex history of the diverse societies and economies of Iran against the background of dynastic changes, revolutions, civil wars, foreign occupation, and the rise of the Islamic Republic. Abbas Amanat combines chronological and thematic approaches, exploring events with lasting implications for modern Iran and the world. Drawing on diverse historical scholarship and emphasizing the twentieth century, he addresses debates about Iran's culture and politics.