History & Geography

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Doomed King, The: A Requiem For Sri Vikrama RajasinhaDoomed King, The: A Requiem For Sri Vikrama Rajasinha by Gananath Obeyesekere

On 24 Jan 1816, the captured king of Kandy was escorted on board the Cornwallis together with his queens, relatives and servants. Almost a month later, King Sri Vikrama Rajasinha arrives at the Vellore Fort in India, to spend his remaining days in exile. Thus ends the tragic tale of the Doomed King of Lanka. Using Kadaimpot, vittipot and documents from English servicemen, Gananath Obeysekere reveals a portrait of a king who was much maligned and betrayed by those he trusted. The Doomed King makes for fascinating reading where a master spy, a Machiavellian governor and an opportunistic nobleman together, bring about the fall of the Kandyan Kingdom.

Spirits And Ships: Cultural Transfers In Early Monsoon AsiaSpirits And Ships: Cultural Transfers In Early Monsoon Asia by Acri, Andrea; R. Blench & A. Landmann (Eds.)

This volume seeks to foreground a borderless history and geography of South, Southeast, and East Asian littoral zones that would be maritime-focused, and thereby explore the ancient connections and dynamics of interaction that favoured the encounters among the cultures found throughout the region stretching from the Indian Ocean littorals to the Western Pacific, from the early historical period to the present. The collective body of work presented in the volume describes Monsoon Asia as an ideal theatre for circulatory dynamics of cultural transfer, interaction, acceptance, selection, and avoidance, and argues that, despite the rich ethnic, linguistic and sociocultural diversity, a shared pattern of values, norms, and cultural models is discernible throughout the region.

Sovereignty And The Sea: How Indonesia Became An Archipelagic StateSovereignty And The Sea: How Indonesia Became An Archipelagic State by Butcher, John G.; R. E. Elson

Until the mid-1950s nearly all of the sea between the far-flung islands of the Indonesian archipelago was open to ships of all nations, but in 1957, the Indonesian government declared that it had absolute sovereignty over all the waters lying within straight baselines drawn between the outermost islands of Indonesia. In this single step, Indonesia made its lands and seas a unified entity for the first time, a claim formally recognized in 1982 by the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Sovereignty and the Sea explores how Indonesia succeeded in its extraordinary claim despite its low international profile. John G. Butcher and R. E. Elson reveal that at the heart of Indonesia's archipelagic campaign was a small group of Indonesian diplomats whose dogged persistence, negotiating skills, and willingness to make difficult compromises resulted in Indonesia becoming the greatest archipelagic state in the world.

Men Who Lost Singapore, 1938-1942, TheMen Who Lost Singapore, 1938-1942, The by Mccrum, Ronald

The British military failure against the Japanese invasion of Singapore in 1942 is a well-documented and closely examined episode. But far less attention has been paid to the role of the colonial governor and his staff during this period, an oversight Ronald McCrum corrects with this insightful history. As McCrum shows, the failure of the civil authorities in conjunction with the military to fully prepare the country for the possibility of war was a key factor in the defeat. McCrum closely examines the role and responsibilities of the colonial authorities before and during the war. He argues that the poor and occasionally hostile relations that developed between the local government and the British military hierarchy prevented the development and implementation of a strategic and unified plan of defense against the growing threat of the Japanese. Consequently, this indecisive and ineffective leadership led to significant losses and civilian casualties that could have been prevented.

Penang: The Fourth Presidency Of India, 1805-1830; Volume Two: Fire, Spice And EdificePenang: The Fourth Presidency Of India, 1805-1830; Volume Two: Fire, Spice And Edifice by Langdon, Marcus

Filling a major gap in historiography, Marcus Langdon offers a meticulous reconstruction of the formative period of Penang's development. A little over two centuries ago, Penang had the distinction of being elevated as the fourth most important settlement - a presidency - of the British East India Company's Indian territories. Developments in Penang would also profoundly influence the future growth of British Malaya. The second of a four-volume series, this book focused on the development of major structures and institutions: Fort Cornwallis, St George's Church, the Penang Free School, the Public Library and the Spice and Botanic Gardens, and the forces of nature which conspired to thwart the settlement: fire and erosion of the seafront. These intermeshed stories continue the groundwork established in Volume One, highlighting the struggles, successes and failures of the early settlement. Beautifully illustrated with paintings, sketches, engravings and maps, many previously unpublished.

Penang's Living Legacy: Heritage Traders Of GeorgetownPenang's Living Legacy: Heritage Traders Of Georgetown by

George Town in Penang is a teeming heritage city where the East and West have converged over the centuries to trade, celebrate and live. This book features 36 unique heritage trades and offers a rare glimpse of the skills and talents of its practitioners.

Little India Of George TownLittle India Of George Town by

Little India remains a most colourful and dynamic enclave amongst the enchanting street networks and precincts in the George Town World Heritage Site. Lavishly illustrated with over 230 specially commissioned photographs and never-before-published historical images, this book documents the still-existing traditional trades, eateries, building architecture, streetscape, culture, festivals and other elements of the community in the enclave. The book also relates interesting and little-known facts about various aspects related to the richly concentrated inner-city area, including its history, communities, trades, landmarks, festivals, streetscapes and architecture.

British And The Vietnam War, The: Their Way With L B JBritish And The Vietnam War, The: Their Way With L B J by Tarling, Nicholas

During the presidency of Lyndon Johnson, the British government sought to avoid escalation of the war in Vietnam and to help bring about peace, but the British were only able to exert little, if any, influence on the United States. In this in-depth analysis of Britain's involvement in the Vietnam War, Nicholas Tarling draws on many overlooked papers in the British archives in order to describe the making of Britain's policy toward the war and its careful negotiations of its connection to America. The result is a revealing account of the Anglo-American relationship that shows that the illusion of Britain's ability to influence the United States in the conduct of war has had a long history.

Japanese And The Jesuits, The: Alessandro Valignano In Sixteenth-Century JapanJapanese And The Jesuits, The: Alessandro Valignano In Sixteenth-Century Japan by Moran, J. F.

The Japanese and the Jesuits examines the attempt by sixteenth century Jesuits to convert the Japanese to Christianity. Directing the Jesuits was the Italian Alessandro Valignano, whose own magisterial writings, many of them not previously translated or published, are the principle source material for this account of one of the most remarkable of all meetings between East and West.

Malayan Communist Party As Recorded In The Cominterm Files, TheMalayan Communist Party As Recorded In The Cominterm Files, The by Hara, Fujio

Comintern (Communist International, 1919-1943) files kept in a Russian Archive were opened to the public in 1991. Various documents relating to the Malayan Communist Party (MCP) were contained therein. Relying on these documents, this research reveals many important and hitherto unknown facts. Consulting with previous works done by C.F. Yong, Cheah Boon Kheng and others, we can identify the extent to which the British colonial Special Branch intercepted them. The inaugural congress of the MCP, which initially depended heavily on the Comintern's instructions, was held on 22-23 April and 21 May 1930. Consistent pivotal points of the instructions were to refrain from armed insurgency and to make every effort to obtain the support of Malays and Indians. Although instructions were stopped after 1935, the MCP continued sending reports until the Pacific War started. These reports depict its internal disputes between the left wing and the right wing, which is supposed to have been headed by Lai Teck. Without instructions from the Comintern, the MCP further strengthened its influence among the people through labour as well as anti-Japanese movements.

Singapore Chronicles: EmergencySingapore Chronicles: Emergency by Kumar Ramakrishna

This book examines the origins of the Communist Party of Malaya (CPM) in the inter-War years and its subsequent development against the wider backdrop of the Cold War. The chameleon-like CPM, in its determined quest to set up a Communist Republic of Malaya and Singapore, mounted a violent rural insurgency in Malaya and later shifted to urban subversion of the bourgeoning anti-colonial left-wing movement in Singapore itself. It was a gambit that almost succeeded. Contemporary Singapore's emphasis on law and order cannot be understood without reference to its long twilight struggle with the CPM, a fateful conflict that ended only in 1989.

Dome In The City: The Story Of The National Museum Of SingaporeDome In The City: The Story Of The National Museum Of Singapore by Shi Hui, Ong; Lim, Sharon (Eds)

This publication looks at the National Museum's transformation over the years, with a focus on its history, collection and building. Through photos from the museum's collection and intriguing lesser-known stories, the book provides a refreshing take on the oldest purpose-built museum in Singapore and celebrates its special role in the nation's cultural and heritage scene.

Mapping The Chinese And Islamic Worlds: Cross Cultural Exchange In Pre-Modern AsiaMapping The Chinese And Islamic Worlds: Cross Cultural Exchange In Pre-Modern Asia by Park Hyunhee

Long before Vasco da Gama rounded the Cape of Good Hope en route to India, the peoples of Africa, the Middle East, and Asia engaged in vigorous cross-cultural exchanges across the Indian Ocean. This book focuses on the years 700 to 1500, a period when powerful dynasties governed both regions, to document the relationship between the Islamic and Chinese worlds before the arrival of the Europeans. Through a close analysis of the maps, geographic accounts, and travelogues compiled by both Chinese and Islamic writers, the book traces the development of major contacts between people in China and the Islamic world and explores their interactions on matters as varied as diplomacy, commerce, mutual understanding, world geography, navigation, shipbuilding, and scientific exploration. When the Mongols ruled both China and Iran in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, their geographic understanding of each other's society increased markedly. This rich, engaging, and pioneering study offers glimpses into the worlds of Asian geographers and mapmakers, whose accumulated wisdom underpinned the celebrated voyages of European explorers like Vasco da Gama.

Justice In Asia And The Pacific Region, 1945-1952Justice In Asia And The Pacific Region, 1945-1952 by Yuma Totani

This book explores a cross-section of war crimes trials that the Allied powers held against the Japanese in the aftermath of World War II. More than 2,240 trials against some 5,700 suspected war criminals were carried out at 51 separate locations across the Asia Pacific region. This book analyzes fourteen high-profile American, Australian, British, and Philippine trials, including the two subsequent proceedings at Tokyo and the Yamashita trial. By delving into a large body of hitherto underutilized oral and documentary history of the war as contained in the trial records, Yuma Totani illuminates diverse firsthand accounts of the war that were offered by former Japanese and Allied combatants, prisoners of war, and the civilian population. Furthermore, the author makes a systematic inquiry into select trials to shed light on a highly complex - and at times contradictory - legal and jurisprudential legacy of Allied war crimes prosecutions.

Connections: History And Architecture, City Hall And Supreme CourtConnections: History And Architecture, City Hall And Supreme Court by

Connections: History and Architecture, City Hall and Supreme Court takes a look at two of Singapore's most prominent National Monuments. The histories of the buildings, their architecture as well as their transformation are presented in three parts. The first part is History and Architecture: These two Monuments had been designed to reflect the aspirations of the Singapore colony and have witnessed pivotal events in Singapore's evolution from a colony to an independent republic. The second part is Dreams and Visions. A photographer's interpretation of the buildings' histories and architectural elements, presented through surrealistic images that invite the imagination of readers and inject a fresh breath of inspiration to the buildings. The third part is Restoration and Preservation. The buildings' restoration and transformation into an art gallery are documented in this essay contributed by Jean Fran?ois Milou and studioMilou Singapore, the architectural firm responsible for this monumental effort.

History Of Malaysia, AHistory Of Malaysia, A by Andaya, Barbara Watson & Leonard Andaya

This brand new edition of A History of Malaysia brings the story of this fascinating country up to date, incorporating the latest scholarship on every period of Malaysian history. Fresh analysis of Islam's historical role in the Malay world and how it links with the growing Islamization of Malaysia today make for a timely study.

Johor: 300 Early PostcardsJohor: 300 Early Postcards by Cheah Jin Seng

Johor: 300 Early Postcards will present a series of postcard galleries showing various aspects of the Peninsular Malaysian state of Johor from the late 19th century to the mid-20th century, in particular the changing landscapes and townscapes. The book will be a richly informative visual guide to a formative period in Johor's history. The postcards presented in the book will be drawn from the vast postcard collection of Dr Cheah Jin Seng, the author of Malaya: 500 Early Postcards, Penang: 500 Early Postcards, Perak: 300 Early Postcards, Selangor: 300 Early Postcards and Singapore: 500 Early Postcards.

Admiral Matelieff's Singapore And Johor, 1606-1616Admiral Matelieff's Singapore And Johor, 1606-1616 by Borschberg, Peter (Ed.)

Cornelis Matelieff de Jonge (c.1570?1632) was admiral of the Dutch East India Company when it sailed to Asia in 1605 and besieged Portuguese Melaka in 1606 with the help of Malay allies. A massive Portuguese armada then arrived from Goa to fight the Dutch and succeeded in breaking the siege on the Portuguese colony. Throughout this time, Matelieff penned a series of letters in which he provided a candid assessment of trading opportunities and politics in Asia. Admiral Matelieff's Singapore and Johor offers an edited selection of Matelieff's most important writings from this period, focusing on his experience and interest in Singapore and the Straits of Melaka. The rediscovery of Matelieff's writings have helped to reshape the way local history is taught and understood in Singapore and Malaysia, and this collection will be essential to scholars of the region.

Southeast Asia In Ruins: Art And Empire In The Early 19Th CenturySoutheast Asia In Ruins: Art And Empire In The Early 19Th Century by Tiffin, Sarah

British artists and commentators in the late 18th and early 19th century encoded the twin aspirations of progress and power in images and descriptions of Southeast Asia's ruined Hindu and Buddhist candis, pagodas, wats and monuments. To the British eye, images of the remains of past civilisations allowed, indeed stimulated, philosophical meditations on the rise and decline of entire empires. Ruins were witnesses to the fall, humbling and disturbingly prophetic, (and so revealing more about British attitudes than they do about Southeast Asia's cultural remains). This important study of a highly appealing but relatively neglected body of work adds multiple dimensions to the history of art and image production in Britain of the period, showing how the anxieties of empire were encoded in the genre of landscape paintings and prints.

Ipoh When Tin Was King (Vol. 1 & 2)Ipoh When Tin Was King (Vol. 1 & 2) by Ho Tak Ming

In spite of being sidelined as an official town by the colonial government, Ipoh could still consider herself the most favoured of Malayan towns. For she had one thing in abundance - tin! Tin gave Ipoh more millionaires than any other Malayan town; it gave her confidence and vibrancy; it gave her a soul. This is the story of Ipoh's Golden Age, an era that is now shrouded in the mist of time, but which present-day Ipohites can take pride in and draw inspiration from.