Politics & Economics

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Regime Change In Malaysia: Ge14 And The End Of Umno-Bn's 60-Year RuleRegime Change In Malaysia: Ge14 And The End Of Umno-Bn's 60-Year Rule by Loh, Francis; Anil Netto (Eds.)

This book is a collection of 40-plus essays by 30-plus Malaysians about GE14 on 9 May 2018. It is a record of an unprecedented defeat of the UMNO-BN government, in power since 1957, and its replacement by Pakatan Harapan, a newly formed coalition. These essays discuss the major election issues, the principal actors, the campaign, the results and where we might be headed in the next decade. Regardless of the specifics, GE14 has ushered in Regime Change. We are witnessing change that goes beyond the displacement of one government by another as occurs when a different party takes over in western liberal democracies. Regime Change is more than that in at least three aspects: first, there are changes in the make-up of the socio-economic alliance that is backing up the new government; second, we see changes in the major political institutions, as in the whittling down of the humongous Prime Minister's Department and impending reform of some others like the MACC, the SPR and the civil service, and the replacement of self-serving, inefficient top personnel; and third, the adoption of new policies in public transport, education, labour and welfare concerns or disaster management - which are hopefully more pro-people and less wasteful of resources compared to previous policies.

Rising Moon, The: Political Change In Sarawak, 1959-1972Rising Moon, The: Political Change In Sarawak, 1959-1972 by Leigh, Michael

The Rising Moon was the first in-depth study of the beginnings of modern politics in Sarawak between 1959 and 1972. The plural society of that state offered a stark contrast to that elsewhere in Malaysia, for in Sarawak viable political parties spanned ethnic divisions, a development that had not then taken place in the other parts of the nation. Side-by-side with the development of politics came the integration of Sarawak within Malaysia, and all the attendant tensions that followed from the merging of this its largest state within an expanded federation. The resultant pattern of politics was dynamic, and throughout this phase remained quite tentative due in large part to Indonesian confrontation and the armed activities of the local communist organisation. Amongst the states of Malaysia, Sarawak is unique, as all groups are in a minority, whether they be defined by ethnicity, religion or mother tongue. That necessitated political compromise spanning ethnic, religious and cultural divisions.

1Mdb: The Scandal That Brought Down A Government A Prime Minister, A Whizz Kid And The Biggest Kleptocracy The World Has Ever Known1Mdb: The Scandal That Brought Down A Government A Prime Minister, A Whizz Kid And The Biggest Kleptocracy The World Has Ever Known by P. Gunasegaram & Kinibiz

This book is a gripping account of the biggest, most audacious kleptocracy the world has ever known - over RM40 billion lost or stolen by a corrupt Malaysian government through 1Malaysia Development Berhad or 1MDB. It has all the elements of a Hollywood thriller with a cast featuring a sultan, a prime minister, his high-flying and even more high-spending wife, and a baby-faced whizz kid as the mastermind who was in his late twenties when it all started and who cavorted with actors and socialites such as Leonardo DiCaprio and Paris Hilton on yachts and other expensive places. Despite the Barisan Nasional government going to great lengths to cover up the scandal, it exploded and spread. The people tired of the blatant theft threw BN out in the general elections of 9 May, ending 61 years of uninterrupted BN rule. The book shows how the scandal developed, the way the various embezzlements were executed, traces the money flows and tracks the beneficiaries of a crime which could not go undetected because it was so big. Now, those who are responsible are finally being brought to account through a process which will take years.

Sarawak Report, The: The Inside Story Of The 1Mdb ExposeSarawak Report, The: The Inside Story Of The 1Mdb Expose by Clare Rewcastle Brown

This is the story of the have-nots and the have-yachts,of the failings of globalisation, and how a tiny rainforest campaign derailed the world's largest theft and brought down a government. The Sarawak Report is the stranger-than-fiction tale of how one woman uncovered the world's biggest theft which, in 2018, brought down the Malaysian government. Investigating the deforestation of Sarawak, Borneo, and the dispossession of its people, journalist Clare Rewcastle Brown followed a trail ofcorruption that led her to the heart of Malaysian politics and to Prime Minister Najib Razak himself Determined that the public should know the truth, she started a blog, which became Malaysia's go-to news outlet for information that the government was trying to suppress - and whistleblowers wanted to get out. She was soon running a radio station too. To nail down absolute proof, Rewcastle Brown criss-crossed the globe and, defying danger, pieced together the evidence of the 1MDB scandal- the theft of billions from the country's sovereign wealth fund. Her reporting - exposing the shady dealings of international politicians, finance powerhouses, prominent PR firms, and Hollywood glitterati - convulsed Malaysian politics and reverberated around the world. The US government made its largest ever kleptocracy asset seizure, while banks and bankers fell. Sweeping in scope, The Sarawak Report provides a jaw-dropping behind the-scenes narrative of Malaysia's recent turbulent political struggles, revealing, as never before, how government funded cyber-warfare and fake news operate, and, in an era of threadbare mainstream media, demonstrating that epoch-changing investigative journalism is still possible. It is an urgent account of the reality of globalisation - and the astonishing story of how one person made a difference.

Mythbusting In Vietnam: Facts, Fiction, FantasiesMythbusting In Vietnam: Facts, Fiction, Fantasies by Earl, Catherine (Ed.)

Vietnam is studied and understood in myriad ways. Even so, much of this knowledge is framed by a limited number of dominant paradigms. The concern of this volume - which applies a postmodern approach to knowledge production in area studies - is to highlight the value of knowledge diversity by challenging some of these paradigms and the myths that are shaped within them. The purpose of this volume, thus, is twofold: first, to identify problematic axiomatic knowledge and raise alternative possibilities and, second, to highlight the value of interdisciplinarity and methodologically diverse approaches in expanding and enhancing knowledge production.

State, Ulama And Islam In Malaysia And Indonesia, TheState, Ulama And Islam In Malaysia And Indonesia, The by Norshahril Saat

In response to the Islamic resurgence of the 1970s and beyond, the Suharto and Mahathir governments undertook massive Islamisation programmes in Indonesia and Malaysia respectively. This included co-opting influential religious scholars into state-sponsored institutions. The 'official' ulamas - the religious scholars who participated in these institutions - were expected to support the states' ideologies in exchange for reward and recognition. The State, Ulama and Islam in Malaysia and Indonesia examines the extent to which official ulamas in contemporary Indonesia and Malaysia capitalised on their co-optation to 'capture' the states. By capture, a concept popularized in political economy, the author refers to societal actors' ability to influence laws, policies, and the distribution of resources in their favour. The book examines how policies undertaken by Suharto and Mahathir determine capture successes and failures of official ulama in their respective countries.

Special Relationship In The Malay World: Indonesia And MalaysiaSpecial Relationship In The Malay World: Indonesia And Malaysia by Ho Ying Chan

Ho Ying Chan provides an expert analysis of Malaysia-Indonesia relations. He demystifies the concept of a "special relationship," rescuing it from woolly, sentimental rhetoric that often emanates from political figures and popular commentators. His well-informed study shows how a state's will to survive in the amoral world of international relations drives its conduct even in circumstances of common identities and common strategic interests with other states. He evaluates comparative evidence to shed light on how a special relationship leads to the emergence of a pluralistic security community.

Other Ladies Of Myanmar, TheOther Ladies Of Myanmar, The by Rigby, Jennifer

In Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi is often not called by her name. Instead, she is just "The Lady", an honorific nickname that signifies her place in the collective imagination of her country. And from global human rights icon to Myanmar's de facto leader, she is certainly a towering figure. But The Lady's reputation has only tarnished in recent years in the face of the persecution of her country's Rohingya minority. In this new book, we present some of Myanmar's other ladies: women from across the social spectrum who are changing their country, and its perceptions of gender, from the ground up. From the artist who defied the junta to hand out sanitary towels at her exhibition, to the Muslim campaigner who has already spent a quarter of her life in prison; from the feminist Buddhist nun to the pop star who gets called a whore for performing; these are the voices of The Other Ladies of Myanmar.

Can Singapore Fall? Making The Future For SingaporeCan Singapore Fall? Making The Future For Singapore by Lim Siong Guan

Lim Siong Guan, Singapore's former Head of Civil Service (1999-2005) was the Institute of Policy Studies' 4th S. R. Nathan Fellow for the Study of Singapore. This book contains edited versions of the three IPS-Nathan Lectures he gave between September and November 2017, and highlights of his dialogue with the audience. Lim addresses the question, "Can Singapore Fall?", by examining the state of Singapore today and proposing what Singapore and Singaporeans must do in order to prevent economic and social decline. Taking inspiration from Sir John Glubb's essay, The Fate of Empires and Search for Survival, Lim urges Singaporeans to counter decline by observing the "three legs of honour": Trust, Diversity, and Excellence. These include becoming a gracious society and building up a culture of innovation, excellence and outwardness.

Does Asean Matter? A View From WithinDoes Asean Matter? A View From Within by Natalegawa, Marty

Written by the highly regarded diplomat Marty Natalegawa, former ambassador and foreign minister of Indonesia, this book offers a unique insider-perspective on the present and future relevance of ASEAN. It is about ASEAN's quest for security and prosperity in a region marked by complex dynamics of power. Namely, the interplay of relations and interests among countries - large and small - which provide the settings within which ASEAN must deliver on its much-cited leadership and centrality in the region. The book seeks to answer the following questions: How can ASEAN build upon its past contributions to the peace, security and prosperity of Southeast Asia, to the wider East Asia, the Asia-Pacific and the Indo-Pacific regions? More fundamentally and a sine qua non, how can ASEAN continue to ensure that peace, security and prosperity prevail in Southeast Asia? And, equally central, how can ASEAN become more relevant to the peoples of ASEAN, such that its contributions can be genuinely felt in making better the lives of its citizens?

Trends In Southeast Asia 2018 #19: Agriculture In Johor: What's Left?Trends In Southeast Asia 2018 #19: Agriculture In Johor: What's Left? by Pakiam, Geoffrey Kevin

Despite decades of industrialization, Johor remains an agricultural powerhouse. The state is Peninsular Malaysia's largest contributor to agricultural gross domestic product, and its official agricultural productivity is Malaysia's third highest. Johor's agricultural strengths lie primarily in product specialization, namely the farming of oil palms, various fruits and vegetables, poultry, pigs, cut flowers, and ornamental fish. Johor's production clusters have taken decades, if not centuries, to build up their regional dominance. Urbanization, often blamed for diminishing agriculture's importance, has actually helped drive Johor's farm growth, even until the present day. Johor's agricultural sector will persist for at least another decade, but may become even more specialized.

Panorama 01/2018: Insights Into Asian And European Affairs - Political ChangePanorama 01/2018: Insights Into Asian And European Affairs - Political Change by

In recent years, domestic politics in both Europe and Asia have arguably become less predictable and prone to sudden, unexpected changes. Although domestic volatility is not a new phenomenon in either region, contemporary drivers are analogous and may be a reflection of a new era, with significant implications for both domestic and foreign policies. In this issue, the authors reflect on contemporary changes in the domestic political architectures in both Europe and Asia and analyse causes, drivers, and impacts in order to get a better understanding of political renewal.

Trends In Southeast Asia 2018 #18: U.S. Relations With Southeast Asia In 2018: More Continuity Than ChangeTrends In Southeast Asia 2018 #18: U.S. Relations With Southeast Asia In 2018: More Continuity Than Change by Shambaugh, David

The US maintains a comprehensive and robust presence throughout Southeast Asia that has grown dramatically since the 1980s. It includes the commercial, security, education and diplomatic, and other domains. However, this presence is not very well appreciated or reported by regional media, whereas China's presence and influence is pervasive. Most Southeast Asian governments are often reluctant to recognize or publicize the US presence or contributions to regional security, stability, and growth. As US-China competition escalates, Southeast Asia will become an epicentre of this competition. Southeast Asian states and ASEAN must elevate their own emphasis and engagement with the US. The US brings many more strengths and benefits than does China and is a far more comprehensive actor in the region. In particular, it would be helpful if ASEAN and its member states would more publicly recognize the contributions and importance of the US.

Trends In Southeast Asia 2018 #16: Developing Eastern Johor: The Pengerang Integrated Petroleum ComplexTrends In Southeast Asia 2018 #16: Developing Eastern Johor: The Pengerang Integrated Petroleum Complex by Serina Rahman

The Pengerang Integrated Petroleum Complex (PIPC) is a huge development that has emerged on the east coast of Johor. Comprising Petronas' largest refinery facility and numerous ancillary and supporting industrial areas, it is pegged to diversify Malaysia's petrochemical industry and reap the benefits of the area's fortunate position on international maritime trade routes. While initial responses to the PIPC development were of concern for Singapore's oil and gas business, the island-nation's long reputation and position in the industry means that the PIPC has some steep learning curves to traverse before coming on par with its southerly neighbour. However, the PIPC is likely to provide a solution to Singapore's limitations in terms of costly services and limited land space. It may also rejuvenate an industry now seen by some SMEs to be somewhat stagnant. While there are myriad global trends that may inhibit the complete success of the PIPC, it seems to be well placed to provide economic spillover benefits for Johor and Malaysia. Even if it does not become a top regional player, it will be able to meet local demands for Euro 5 quality products.

Networked: Business And Politics In Decentralizing Indonesia, 1998-2004Networked: Business And Politics In Decentralizing Indonesia, 1998-2004 by Prasetyawan, Wahyu

B. J. Habibie may have served the shortest term of any of Indonesia's presidents, but his push for decentralization would affect the country for decades. Habibie came to power in 1998 and immediately set to work restructuring the government. He gave local districts more power, allowing them to elect their own leaders and create their own bylaws. After years of authoritarian rule, these reforms were meant to return power to the people. But that led to local governments engaging in bureaucratic and political conflict with the central government over control of valuable natural resources and the distribution of the revenue they generated. Decentralization became the most important political economic development in Indonesia of the past 30 years. This volume evaluates three cases of deep-seated political conflict and intrigue including central government, local governments, and multinational companies. It looks at how the structure of the national political economy has changed as the result of local politicians becoming involved in disputes with the national government over control of natural resources. It also analyzes how these changes will affect the distribution of wealth in the country as well as Indonesia's evolving democratic politics and modes of governance.

Aspirations With Limitations: Indonesia's Foreign Affairs Under Susilo Bambang YudhoyonoAspirations With Limitations: Indonesia's Foreign Affairs Under Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono by Fionna, Ulla; Siwage Dharma Negara Et Al (Eds.)

As the first directly elected Indonesian president, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (SBY) served at a crucial juncture in Indonesia's history. Succeeding the three short presidencies of BJ Habibie, Abdurrahman Wahid and Megawati Sukarnoputri, his presidency had a lot to prove. While critical assessment of SBY's domestic policies have been undertaken, less attention has been paid to his foreign policy. This volume seeks to fill this gap by examining key foreign policy issues during SBY's tenure, including bilateral relations, Indonesia's involvement in international organizations, and pivotal issues such as international labour and terrorism. The book provides an assessment of the direction of his foreign policy and management style, paying particular attention to his concerns over Indonesia's territorial integrity and sovereignty, the significance of international institutions, and Indonesia's right to lead.

Trends In Southeast Asia 2018 #15: State Formation In Riau Islands ProvinceTrends In Southeast Asia 2018 #15: State Formation In Riau Islands Province by Amri, Mulya; Faizal Rianto

The formation of the Riau Islands Province (RIP) in 2002 is argued to be part of a broader trend of pemekaran (blossoming) that saw the creation of seven new provinces and more than 100 new districts throughout Indonesia after the fall of the New Order. This article argues that the main motivation for these subnational movements was a combination of rational interests and cultural sentiments. Since becoming its own province, RIP has been performing well and has surpassed Riau, the "parent" province, in multiple aspects including human development, poverty alleviation, and government administration. Despite the usual hiccups such as capacity gaps and corruption, the formation of the Province has been positive in achieving a balance between keeping the country intact while allowing local stakeholders a substantial level of autonomy.

Trends In Southeast Asia 2018 #14: Pancasila And The Challenge Of Political Islam: Past And PresentTrends In Southeast Asia 2018 #14: Pancasila And The Challenge Of Political Islam: Past And Present by Suryadinata, Leo

Islam has become an important symbol in post-Suharto Indonesia, and political figures or parties feel they cannot afford to be seen to be against the religion or be considered unfriendly to it. Islamism emerges to challenge Pancasila (or cultural pluralism) again. The future of Pancasila depends on whether the Indonesian government and other pluralist forces are able to control the Islamists and provide political stability and economic development in the country.

Trends In Southeast Asia 2018 #13: The Trends In Southeast Asia 2018 #13: The "Free And Open Indo-Pacific" And Implications For Asean by Lee, John

In recent times, the US, Japan and Australia have all promoted extremely similar visions of a Free and Open Indo-Pacific as the central organizing concept to guide their efforts in the region. The concept is essentially a reaffirmation of the security and economic rules-based order which was cobbled together after the Second World War - especially as it relates to freedom of the regional and global commons such as sea, air and cyberspace, and the way nations conduct economic relations. ASEAN and its member states continue to delay any definitive response to the Free and Open Indo-Pacific concept. Although its principles are attractive to many ASEAN member states, long-held conceptions of ASEAN centrality and its meaning gives the organization apparent reason for hesitation. The reality is that while ASEAN and major member states are focused primarily on the risks of action, there are considerable risks of inaction and hesitation. The current era will either enhance or lessen the relevance of ASEAN in the eyes of these three countries in the years ahead depending on how the organisation and its key member states respond.

Anwar Returns: The Final Twist - The Prosecution And Release Of Anwar IbrahimAnwar Returns: The Final Twist - The Prosecution And Release Of Anwar Ibrahim by Trowell, Mark

On 16 May 2018, Anwar Ibrahim was released from prison and receives a full royal pardon from the King of Malaysia. This was an astonishing turn of events for the former Deputy Prime Minister who was serving a second prison term for sodomy, a charge that Anwar has always refuted. Read about the dramatic twists and turns in the prosecution of Anwar Ibrahim, from when he was first charged with sodomy in September 1998 to his vindication 20 years later. This book covers not only the trials and prosecution Anwar was subjected to and which led to the guilty verdict and sentence of fiveyears' imprisonment in February 2015, it also recounts the changing political tide sweeping through Malaysia that culminated in his historic release in 2018. Mark Trowell also presents an exclusive interview with Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim. In a wide-ranging discussion, held in May 2018, Anwar reveals much about his time in prison, his new relationship with Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad and his vision for Malaysia.