Hong Kong

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Chinese Ghosts Revisited: A Study Of Paranormal Beliefs And ExperiencesChinese Ghosts Revisited: A Study Of Paranormal Beliefs And Experiences by Emmons, Charles

Do the Hong Kong Chinese experience ghosts, hauntings, spirit mediumship, ESP and other paranormal phenomena just like British and Americans? Or is their culture so different that the ghost accounts in this book will seem bizarre to anyone else? This classic presentation of cases is based on 3,600 interviews, questionnaires and observations in Hong Kong in 1980/81, updated by recent materials over 30 years later. For this 2017 edition, Charles Emmons has revisited his earlier conclusions and added new material that has come to light in the intervening years. This book remains the only major cross-cultural study comparing Chinese with Western ghost experiences.

Hong Kong 20/20: Reflections On A Borrowed PlaceHong Kong 20/20: Reflections On A Borrowed Place by Ho, Tammy

The handover in 1997 saw Hong Kong's smooth transition from colonial to Communist rule under the auspices of the 'one country, two systems' framework. But twenty years on, the real impact of the sovereignty change is just starting to register: the city's near-total economic integration with the mainland, a massive influx of Chinese visitors, simmering cross-border tensions and a rapid erosion of freedoms. Believing that we are stronger and louder together, PEN Hong Kong invited some of Hong Kong's most prominent literary and creative minds to reflect on the city's post-colonial development, in a definitive compendium of essays, poems, fiction and artwork that marks this historical milestone.

Tiger Hunters Of Tai O, TheTiger Hunters Of Tai O, The by Saeki, John

Hong Kong, 1954. The British colony was not yet ready to hear about a Eurasian policeman having an affair with the police commissioner's daughter. Twenty-two-year-old Simon Lee tasted swift punishment. He was banished to the outer fringes of the territory, to the far tip of a wild and distant island a stone's throw from mainland Chinese waters - to Tai O, the ancient and murky trading post where fishermen, salt-farmers and refugees were thrown together with spies, pirates and triads. Pink dolphins swam the waters, eagles fished the sea, and some still believed that a tiger prowled the hills at night. Life was unpredictable for the band of beer-swilling misfits that staffed Tai O Police Station. Some said they needed reining in. But when a stranger was murdered on a beach, accused of being a Communist spy, Lee found himself on an unexpected collision course with his own masters in Central. Who had the dead man been working for? What did the secret agents know? Why was Central so eager to brush the execution aside? And who or what really was the 'tiger'?

Hong Kong On The Brink: An American Diplomat Relives 1967'S Darkest DaysHong Kong On The Brink: An American Diplomat Relives 1967'S Darkest Days by Goldsmith, Syd

Syd Goldsmith's first taste of China's Cultural Revolution is blood on his tongue. It's 1967. Hong Kong is simmering, plagued by communist-led riots and strikes, crippled transport, punishing water-rationing, takeover threats from Beijing and roadside bombs. And Syd -- the only Caucasian Foreign Service Officer at the American Consulate General who speaks Cantonese -- is made responsible for reporting and analysis of the Hong Kong government's ability to survive. The CIA station chief and the head of Macau's gold syndicate play major roles in Syd's story, along with Newsweek's Sydney Liu and Maynard Parker, and a steady stream of inquiring foreign correspondents and China-watchers. Richard Nixon makes a cameo appearance -- to talk football with Syd since the consul general won't see him -- in this riveting memoir of a year when Hong Kong's "borrowed time" seemed about to expire.

Policing Hong Kong - An Irish History: Irishmen In The Hong Kong Police Force, 1864-1950Policing Hong Kong - An Irish History: Irishmen In The Hong Kong Police Force, 1864-1950 by O'sullivan, Patricia

Hong Kong, 1918. A tranquil place compared to war-torn Europe. But on the morning of the 22nd January, a running battle through the streets of Wanchai ended in "The Siege of Gresson Street". Five policemen lay dead, so shocking Hong Kong that over half the population turned out to watch their funeral procession. One of the dead, Inspector Mortimor O'Sullivan, came from Newmarket: a small town nestled deep in rural Ireland. He, along with a dozen and more relatives, had sailed out to Hong Kong to join the Police Force. Using family records and memories alongside extensive research in Hong Kong, Ireland and London, Patricia O'Sullivan tells the story of these policemen and the criminals they dealt with. This book also gives a rare glimpse into the day-to-day life of working-class Europeans at the time, as it follows the Newmarket men, their wives and families, from their first arrival in 1864 through to 1941 and beyond.

Mingled Voices: Proverse Poetry Prize Anthology 2016Mingled Voices: Proverse Poetry Prize Anthology 2016 by Bickley, Gillian; Verner Bickley (Eds.)

Mingled Voices is an anthology of poetry selected from the poems which were entered in the inaugural annual international competition for the Proverse Poetry Prize (single poems) in 2016. Poems could be submitted on any subject or topic chosen by each poet or on the subject chosen for 2016, "The Environment". There was a free choice of form and style. Included in the anthology are the poems that won the first, second, and third prizes. With the poets' brief biographies, photo portraits, and commentaries on their poems.

Over The Years: Selected Collected Poems 1972-2015Over The Years: Selected Collected Poems 1972-2015 by Bickley, Gillian

The poems collected in this volume have been selected from the author's five previously published collections.

Hk HollowHk Hollow by Dragos Ilca

HK Hollow begins as a simple love story - love lost and love found - that records its bizarre elements in a matter-of-fact kind of way. Carina and Guy are a young couple from Prague, studying in Amsterdam, who find themselves even more estranged when Guy leaves to spend a semester in Hong Kong. There, he meets Ling Fei-yan, a Chinese literature student. It doesn't take long for Guy to notice how much she reminds him of Carina - and to start liking her.

Bliss Of BewildermentBliss Of Bewilderment by Bunzel, Birgit

Bliss of Bewilderment is Dr Birgit Bunzel's second collection of poetry.

Brain Graft: A Play By Laura SolomonBrain Graft: A Play By Laura Solomon by Solomon, Laura

Brain Graft centres around Isobella, who works at a publishing firm and is diagnosed with a brain tumour. She finds a surgeon to remove her tumour and decides to have a brain implant - that is, a segment of brain to fill the space in her brain created by the tumour removal. The segment is donated by another woman, Tracey. After the transplant, Isobella begins to take on characteristics of Tracey's personality. Isobella's boyfriend, Tarquin, is horrified by this. Isobella begins a slow but steady slide down the socio-economic ladder, losing her job and sitting around the flat all day. Tracey's trajectory is the opposite. She takes a job cleaning at a hospital, where she meets David, a nurse, who encourages her to study for a nursing diploma. Tracey lands a job as a nurse at a psychiatric hospital, which is where, in the final scene, she crosses paths with Isobella who has been dumped there by an exasperated Tarquin. David has, by this time, dumped Tracey, claiming that he loved her only because he was seeing the world through rose-tinted spectacles due to the anti-depressants he was on. The two women decide to become lesbian lovers.

Burning Lake, TheBurning Lake, The by Hart, Jonathan Locke

In this book of poetry, Jonathan Locke Hart explores in a contemporary context the divine and human comedy, taking his inspiration from Dante.

Sheriff Of Wan Chai: How An Englishman Helped Govern Hong Kong In Its Last Decades As A British ColonySheriff Of Wan Chai: How An Englishman Helped Govern Hong Kong In Its Last Decades As A British Colony by Mann, Peter

In 1976, Peter Mann left a gloomy England for the last corner of the British empire: Hong Kong. As a police inspector, he commanded a sub-unit and led a district vice squad in Kowloon, before joining the colonial government's Administrative Service and working in the fields of transport, housing, security, environment and tourism. He also served as District Officer for Wan Chai. From raids on gambling dens to organising Governors' visits, his work involved him in all levels of Hong Kong society. Mann's memoir is an anecdotal, historical and racy account of Hong Kong's last decades as a British colony and the colourful story of a young Englishman in the twilight of empire.

Collected Hong Kong StoriesCollected Hong Kong Stories by David T. K. Wong

For an arresting mosaic of the great and complex metropolis known as Hong Kong - and an insight into what the people of the city live by and die for - a reader need look no further than the Collected Hong Kong Stories of David T. K. Wong. Wong, a native son of this once British Crown Colony and now Special Administrative Region of China, has drawn upon his own experiences as a journalist, educator, government official and businessman to assemble a range of memorable characters for his tales. They range from barmen to labourers, from jockeys to expatriate bureaucrats, from scholars to tycoons, and each is infused with insights into the collective soul of the edgy, anomalous and perplexing place he finds himself. These 18 stories are carefully crafted in the grand tradition of O. Henry, Maugham and Saki. Each has been individually published in a magazine or broadcast over radio in Britain, the United States, Hong Kong or elsewhere. They can be dipped into and savoured separately or feasted upon all in one go. Either way, the result can only be satisfying.

How To Hong Kong: An Illustrated Travel JournalHow To Hong Kong: An Illustrated Travel Journal by Lena Sin; Nicholas Tay

In this joyful travel sketchbook, Hong Kong is captured through the hearts of a writer and an artist. From the winding, incense-filled streets of Sheung Wan to the pandemonium of a wet market in North Point to the sleepy island backwater of Tai O, Lena Sin and Nicholas Tay take you on a wonder-filled journey that shines a light on the softer, more romantic side of this chaotic city. Filled with tales of growing up in Hong Kong, Lena weaves personal anecdotes and conversations with locals with richly-illustrated watercolours and photographs by herself and artist husband Nicholas. The result is an intimate portrait of a city that is at once vibrant and energetic as well as charming and nostalgic.

Beyond BrightnessBeyond Brightness by Sarman, Sanja

A succession of tales where characters, many of whom are both somber and ridiculous, have the sinews of their will cut by the knife of fate, or desire. Sarman occasionally seems to be arguing that these phenomena come down to one and the same thing; adducing sentiment as proof. Just as the carbon found in diamonds comes from the living and the dead alike, so dreams, lapses of thought, involuntary visions and sheer boredom are indiscriminately transformed into the gemstone of the special kind of feeling Sarman capitalizes on - a feeling which, if it had a name, would be love of fate. Although the characters are curiously individuated, the center stage in this book is occupied by Sarman's lyrical voice, shot through and through with mystical pain, and the same stubbornly immature longing which characterized Leopardi's "rage to live" in this desert we call the world.

Curveball: Life Never Comes At You StraightCurveball: Life Never Comes At You Straight by Preller, Gustav

What Thomas Bland, formerly senior manager, now plain senior, expects upon his retirement in the seaside city of Durban isn't remotely what he gets. His wife, Caro, leaves him and he loses his friends through betrayal, illness and murder. All the while, socio-political storm clouds are gathering over South Africa. Tom gets caught up in events bigger than he could have ever imagined, and he has to fight for his life and love. The author skilfully sets a small, tightly knit group of characters within a philosophical and moral framework, against a background of a corrupt country sliding out of control.

Black Tortoise WinterBlack Tortoise Winter by Pearson, Jan

Near the end of a twitchy year, as China opens its doors to foreign investment and Hong Kong ponders its future, Pearl Green returns on the same day that Marcus Brown arrives on a mission to set up an investment project to benefit his affluent Native American Indian community in Florida, America. Pearl is back to resume management of The June Bowen Foundation and takes up temporary residence in The Hilton Hotel. Marcus, uneasy about his first trip overseas, also checks in to The Hilton and is about to enjoy his first meal in Hong Kong when he is approached by a conman, Terry Shaw, who begins laying the foundations for carrying out a scheme to relieve Marcus of his people's investment funds. The following day, Marcus's sense of unease turns to panic when he is framed for a murder which takes place in the hotel, that of the wealthy business tycoon Dennis Childs, the father of one of Pearl's friends - the famous Belinda Jones, celebrity wife of rock legend Smut Jones. Whilst Marcus languishes in a prison cell, Belinda returns to bury her father and disappears from The Hilton while on her way to visit Pearl. Peter Benson, concerned that Pearl is somehow central to Belinda's kidnapping, consults Pearl's father. When James Gates announces that he will be in Hong Kong during the first week of winter and old friend Yip Yee Koon - whose own networks are humming - warns her to be on the alert, Pearl knows that the atmosphere described by Yip as a state of strangeness means that trouble has arrived in Hong Kong. It takes all the qualities that the mythological turtle can harness - wisdom and the valour of a warrior - for James, Pearl, Peter Benson and Yip Yee Koon to overcome the criminal forces that enter their lives in this dark and dangerous winter - a Black Tortoise Winter.

Adam's FranchiseAdam's Franchise by Gray, Lawrence

In the land of Daoistan, freedom has arrived at last. The revolution liberated all, then enslaved everyone, and now it was liberating them again by allowing people to own credit cards. And a man with credit is a man who has the world at his fingertips, or at least a trip into town where the temptations are pretty much as they have always been, only more people can afford them. Adam's Franchise is a story about Adam and his Franchise. He is not quite sure what that means, but he is a modern man, embracing the economic miracle and taking up a gift shop franchise at a new hotel. There he will sell much the same things that he always sold: baskets, pots, cultural artefacts of various kinds, except at a modern price to foreigners, should they ever care to come to the hotel. The desert that he lives in is not the most beautiful of places, policed by Omar who has to learn how to get out of his hammock, fuelled by Castrol who just loves the smell of petrol and the visions it gives him, and terrorised by nomads and Adam's volatile brothers-in-law. But if it ever rids itself of the last vestiges of barbarism, both pre-revolutionary and revolutionary, as epitomised by Adam's indolent, lustful, embittered, rapacious, cynical, superstitious father, Saleem, then harmony - both spiritual and economic -might assert itself. Or maybe, just air-conditioning. Daoistan exists everywhere, or has done at some time or other. And there have been many Adams.

Halfway Up A Hill: Stories From Hong KongHalfway Up A Hill: Stories From Hong Kong by Morton, T. A.

In Halfway up a Hill, an array of characters from the eight distinctive short stories converge and interact in and around a busy Soho coffee shop in Hong Kong. In the air-conditioned confines of an unassuming coffee shop halfway up (or down, depending on your point of view) a steep Hong Kong hillside, a multitude of lives entwine, unravel and spin off, together and apart, all watched over and influenced by forces the people involved only vaguely apprehend-as well as observed by the benign spirits that occupy the shop bathroom. The collection of intriguing stories told in Halfway Up A Hill both stimulate and beguile, like a sip of hot coffee on a cold day.

Fishing In Hong Kong: A How-To Guide To Making The Most Of The Territory's Shores, Reservoirs And Surrounding WatersFishing In Hong Kong: A How-To Guide To Making The Most Of The Territory's Shores, Reservoirs And Surrounding Waters by Sharp, Mike; John Peters; Lizzie Sharp-Eliazar

Did you leave your fishing rods at home before relocating to Hong Kong, unaware that such a densely populated place could support recreational fishing? Mike Sharp and John Peters walk you through the local angling spots and describe key tactics normally known only by Hong Kong anglers. Carp fishing, pier fishing, and trolling for game fish are just some of the topics covered in a warm, descriptive text beautifully illustrated by Lizzie Sharp-Eliazar. Whether you live in a skyscraper or a village, this book will encourage you to get out onto the territory's beautiful waters or rocky shore and cast a line - in the hope that the next one will be the one that didn't get away.