Hong Kong

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Sunset Survivors: Meet The People Keeping Hong Kong's Traditional Industries AliveSunset Survivors: Meet The People Keeping Hong Kong's Traditional Industries Alive by Varty, Lindsay; Gary Jones (Photos)

Sunset Survivors tells the stories of Hong Kong's traditional tradesmen and women through stunning imagery and candid interviews. Covering a myriad of curious professions that are quickly falling into obscurity, from fortune telling to face threading and letter writing to bird cage making, readers soon find themselves immersed in the streets of old Hong Kong. Filled with interviews, photographs and little-known facts about the city's twilight industries, Sunset Survivors is a tribute to those who keep the flame burning in a city besieged by foreign imports and stiff competition. Survivors is more than just a travel or coffee-table book; it is a tribute to the city's character, a celebration of its roots and a guide to its evolution. Survivors is a vital piece of history.

Other Voices, Other Eyes: Expatriate Lives In Hong KongOther Voices, Other Eyes: Expatriate Lives In Hong Kong by Nunan, David

The stories of expatriates in Hong Kong - the most dynamic, dramatic and diverse city in the Asia-Pacific region - come to life in this book. Why did they come? Why do they stay? How did Hong Kong change them and their view of the world? What did they gain and what did they lose? Human beings are on the move, driven by economic globalisation, political persecution, love or simple curiosity; and this global flow defines the age in which we live. From these expat stories, larger themes loom: identities transformed; racism, naked and clothed; blended relationships; and the tensions and tolerance engendered through peoples, languages and cultures in contact.

Farewell, My Colony: Last Days In The Life Of British Hong KongFarewell, My Colony: Last Days In The Life Of British Hong Kong by Crowell, Todd

In the heart of Beijing, a large digital clock marked off the seconds until July 1, 1997, when the red, five-star flag of China would be hoisted over Hong Kong - and the grand but untried idea of "one country, two systems" would be put into practice. Farewell, My Colony is a real-time journal of the end of an era by an objective observer. American journalist Todd Crowell captures a unique moment in history as Britain stoically soldiers through the last months of its 156 years of colonial rule, China waits restlessly to resume its sovereignty, and Hong Kong buzzes with endless speculation. He tells how Hong Kong's Chinese and expatriates, taipans and cagemen come to terms with the impending change of rule. He mingles with the rich and famous and common people alike. A long-term resident, he votes in elections controversially called by Governor Chris Patten. He then follows the selection of a rival legislature, and of Patten's successor, shipping magnate Tung Chee-hwa, as the first chief executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. The city's pulse is charted by his pen, through to the pomp, circumstance and partying of the day of handover itself. Now, 20 years later, Crowell has updated this valuable historical record with reflections on what has happened to Hong Kong since 1997.

The Peak: An Illustrated History Of Hong Kong's Top DistrictThe Peak: An Illustrated History Of Hong Kong's Top District by Gerrett, Richard J.

The Peak is Hong Kong's top residential district, where property prices are as high as the altitude. How did it become an exclusive enclave in the bustling business center of 19th-century Asia? The British wanted relief from summer heat and the Peak was the obvious place to escape it. When the Governor adopted Mountain Lodge as a summer getaway, development accelerated and the opening of the Peak Tram in 1888 made access easier. Gradually a community developed and a church, a club and a school were established. This book describes how the now-popular tourist area developed over time and adapted as needs changed.

Tin Hats And Rice: A Diary Of Life As A Hong Kong Prisoner Of War, 1941-1945Tin Hats And Rice: A Diary Of Life As A Hong Kong Prisoner Of War, 1941-1945 by Anslow, Barbara

"I can't visualise us getting out of this, but I want to TRY to believe in a future," wrote 23-year-old Barbara Anslow (then Redwood) in her diary on 8th December 1941, a few hours after Japan first attacked Hong Kong. Her 1941-1946 diaries (with postwar explanations where necessary) are an invaluable source of information on the civilian experience in British Hong Kong during the second world war. The diaries record her thoughts and experiences through the fighting, the surrender, three-and-a-half years of internment, then liberation and adjustment to normal life. The diaries have been quoted by leading historians on the subject. Now they are available in print for the first time, making them available to a wider audience.

Hong Kong ConfidentialHong Kong Confidential by Wong, David T. K.

A former senior Chinese Administrative Officer has at long last lifted another corner of the veil of half-truths which have shrouded many of the decisions taken under the long governorship of Sir Murray MacLehose. David Wong - who started working life as a dishwasher in a Chinese restaurant at the age of 13 before becoming a journalist, teacher, bureaucrat, businessman, and then a writer of short stories and novels - has turned his narrative skills to producing a pungent, cerebral and revelatory insider memoir of his experiences in the upper reaches of the colonial administration during the 1970s. He constantly struggled with a three-horned dilemma: how to serve the people of Hong Kong, who paid his salary; the wider Chinese nation, from which he was culturally and emotionally inseparable; and the demands of the British crown, to which he had publicly sworn his allegiance. This is a valuable contribution to the historical mosaic of a dynamic and paradoxical Chinese community living through turbulent times.

Faithful Record Of The Lisbon Maru Incident, AFaithful Record Of The Lisbon Maru Incident, A by Finch, Brian (Trans.)

This is a recent translation from an original Chinese publication covering an important chapter in Hong Kong's wartime history. It gives details of the Lisbon Maru Incident of 1942, seen through the eyes of the Chinese fishermen who rescued hundreds of British prisoners of war from Hong Kong, whose ship had been torpedoed. The Japanese had tried to keep them in the holds as the ship sank, and then shot at them as they tried to escape. These courageous fishermen not only prevented hundreds more deaths, they also hid three prisoners under the noses of the Japanese until they could be sent secretly on a journey across more than 1,000 miles of China to reach Chongqing, from where they could tell the world what had happened. The book also recounts the visit to Zhoushan in 2005 of one of the survivors of the sinking and his emotional reunion with those who saved him; as well as a visit to Hong Kong in the same year of the last few remaining fishermen who had taken part in the rescue.

Through American Eyes: The Journals Of George Washington (Farley) Heard 1837-1875Through American Eyes: The Journals Of George Washington (Farley) Heard 1837-1875 by Bickley, Gillian (Ed.)

Long ago secrets, lost emotions and persistent sadness at human conflict are finally revealed in this first publication of journals written by a young American visiting the Far East for the first time. Travelling out in 1859 to join his uncle's then successful trading house, Augustine Heard & Co., George was hired on shipboard by fellow-passenger John E. Ward, the American Minister tasked with the ratification of the American-Chinese treaty. As an attaché to the American Legation, George witnessed the June 1859 Battle of the Peiho, and in July 1860 - now promoted as Secretary of Legation - he saw the western Allies' preparations for the return battle that took place in August 1860. At least one of his letters home was borrowed to be copied by the American Minister and sent to the US President as an official report. These were early days in the intercourse between the United States and the Far East; a first Treaty with Japan (which George also visited and writes about here) had been agreed only a short time earlier. Some of the Chinese people whom George talked with in villages visited on the way to Beijing had never heard of his country. A cultured, charming and conscientious person, with a sense of humour, an early-developed cross-cultural perspective, and highly readable writing style, George W. Heard died unmarried in his late thirties, and was buried far from home. This book finally brings home his memorial.

Mentoring Reversed: The Road To Creativity And ImaginationMentoring Reversed: The Road To Creativity And Imagination by Gregoire, Peter

Reverse mentoring turns traditional mentoring on its head, by having a young employee serve as a mentor to a seasoned member of management. Businesses have been using it to teach their senior leaders the wonders of social media and other disruptive technology, but the roots of reverse mentoring run far deeper than this. Youthful mentorship, has, in fact, inspired some of the most important people in history and influenced events which have changed the world. This book brings these stories to light, and shows how, through reverse mentoring, it is possible to build a deep understanding across generations and embed diversity, humility, creativity and imagination into the culture of any organisation.

Cry Of The Flying RhinoCry Of The Flying Rhino by Ngeow, Ivy

This novel is set in 1996 Malaysia and Borneo, told from multiple viewpoints and in multiple voices. Malaysian Chinese family doctor Benjie Lee has had a careless one night stand with his new employee - mysterious, teenage Talisa, the adopted daughter of a wealthy, crass Scottish plantation owner, Ian, in the provincial Malaysian town of Segamat. Talisa's arms are covered in elaborate tattoos, symbolic of great personal achievements among the Iban tribe in her native Borneo. Talisa has fallen pregnant and Ian forces Benjie to marry her. Benjie, who relished his previous life as a carefree, cosmopolitan bachelor, struggles to adapt to life as a husband and father. Meanwhile, Minos - an Iban who has languished ten years in a Borneo prison for a murder he didn't commit - is released into English missionary Bernard's care. One day, Minos and his sidekick and fellow ex-convict Watan appear in Segamat, forcing Benjie to confront his wife's true identity and ultimately his own fears. Are the tattoos the key to her secrets?

Chinese Ghosts Revisited: A Study Of Paranormal Beliefs And ExperiencesChinese Ghosts Revisited: A Study Of Paranormal Beliefs And Experiences by Emmons, Charles

Do the Hong Kong Chinese experience ghosts, hauntings, spirit mediumship, ESP and other paranormal phenomena just like British and Americans? Or is their culture so different that the ghost accounts in this book will seem bizarre to anyone else? This classic presentation of cases is based on 3,600 interviews, questionnaires and observations in Hong Kong in 1980/81, updated by recent materials over 30 years later. For this 2017 edition, Charles Emmons has revisited his earlier conclusions and added new material that has come to light in the intervening years. This book remains the only major cross-cultural study comparing Chinese with Western ghost experiences.

Hong Kong 20/20: Reflections On A Borrowed PlaceHong Kong 20/20: Reflections On A Borrowed Place by Ho, Tammy

The handover in 1997 saw Hong Kong's smooth transition from colonial to Communist rule under the auspices of the 'one country, two systems' framework. But twenty years on, the real impact of the sovereignty change is just starting to register: the city's near-total economic integration with the mainland, a massive influx of Chinese visitors, simmering cross-border tensions and a rapid erosion of freedoms. Believing that we are stronger and louder together, PEN Hong Kong invited some of Hong Kong's most prominent literary and creative minds to reflect on the city's post-colonial development, in a definitive compendium of essays, poems, fiction and artwork that marks this historical milestone.

Tiger Hunters Of Tai O, TheTiger Hunters Of Tai O, The by Saeki, John

Hong Kong, 1954. The British colony was not yet ready to hear about a Eurasian policeman having an affair with the police commissioner's daughter. Twenty-two-year-old Simon Lee tasted swift punishment. He was banished to the outer fringes of the territory, to the far tip of a wild and distant island a stone's throw from mainland Chinese waters - to Tai O, the ancient and murky trading post where fishermen, salt-farmers and refugees were thrown together with spies, pirates and triads. Pink dolphins swam the waters, eagles fished the sea, and some still believed that a tiger prowled the hills at night. Life was unpredictable for the band of beer-swilling misfits that staffed Tai O Police Station. Some said they needed reining in. But when a stranger was murdered on a beach, accused of being a Communist spy, Lee found himself on an unexpected collision course with his own masters in Central. Who had the dead man been working for? What did the secret agents know? Why was Central so eager to brush the execution aside? And who or what really was the 'tiger'?

Hong Kong On The Brink: An American Diplomat Relives 1967'S Darkest DaysHong Kong On The Brink: An American Diplomat Relives 1967'S Darkest Days by Goldsmith, Syd

Syd Goldsmith's first taste of China's Cultural Revolution is blood on his tongue. It's 1967. Hong Kong is simmering, plagued by communist-led riots and strikes, crippled transport, punishing water-rationing, takeover threats from Beijing and roadside bombs. And Syd -- the only Caucasian Foreign Service Officer at the American Consulate General who speaks Cantonese -- is made responsible for reporting and analysis of the Hong Kong government's ability to survive. The CIA station chief and the head of Macau's gold syndicate play major roles in Syd's story, along with Newsweek's Sydney Liu and Maynard Parker, and a steady stream of inquiring foreign correspondents and China-watchers. Richard Nixon makes a cameo appearance -- to talk football with Syd since the consul general won't see him -- in this riveting memoir of a year when Hong Kong's "borrowed time" seemed about to expire.

Policing Hong Kong - An Irish History: Irishmen In The Hong Kong Police Force, 1864-1950Policing Hong Kong - An Irish History: Irishmen In The Hong Kong Police Force, 1864-1950 by O'sullivan, Patricia

Hong Kong, 1918. A tranquil place compared to war-torn Europe. But on the morning of the 22nd January, a running battle through the streets of Wanchai ended in "The Siege of Gresson Street". Five policemen lay dead, so shocking Hong Kong that over half the population turned out to watch their funeral procession. One of the dead, Inspector Mortimor O'Sullivan, came from Newmarket: a small town nestled deep in rural Ireland. He, along with a dozen and more relatives, had sailed out to Hong Kong to join the Police Force. Using family records and memories alongside extensive research in Hong Kong, Ireland and London, Patricia O'Sullivan tells the story of these policemen and the criminals they dealt with. This book also gives a rare glimpse into the day-to-day life of working-class Europeans at the time, as it follows the Newmarket men, their wives and families, from their first arrival in 1864 through to 1941 and beyond.

Mingled Voices: Proverse Poetry Prize Anthology 2016Mingled Voices: Proverse Poetry Prize Anthology 2016 by Bickley, Gillian; Verner Bickley (Eds.)

Mingled Voices is an anthology of poetry selected from the poems which were entered in the inaugural annual international competition for the Proverse Poetry Prize (single poems) in 2016. Poems could be submitted on any subject or topic chosen by each poet or on the subject chosen for 2016, "The Environment". There was a free choice of form and style. Included in the anthology are the poems that won the first, second, and third prizes. With the poets' brief biographies, photo portraits, and commentaries on their poems.

Over The Years: Selected Collected Poems 1972-2015Over The Years: Selected Collected Poems 1972-2015 by Bickley, Gillian

The poems collected in this volume have been selected from the author's five previously published collections.

Hk HollowHk Hollow by Dragos Ilca

HK Hollow begins as a simple love story - love lost and love found - that records its bizarre elements in a matter-of-fact kind of way. Carina and Guy are a young couple from Prague, studying in Amsterdam, who find themselves even more estranged when Guy leaves to spend a semester in Hong Kong. There, he meets Ling Fei-yan, a Chinese literature student. It doesn't take long for Guy to notice how much she reminds him of Carina - and to start liking her.

Bliss Of BewildermentBliss Of Bewilderment by Bunzel, Birgit

Bliss of Bewilderment is Dr Birgit Bunzel's second collection of poetry.

Brain Graft: A Play By Laura SolomonBrain Graft: A Play By Laura Solomon by Solomon, Laura

Brain Graft centres around Isobella, who works at a publishing firm and is diagnosed with a brain tumour. She finds a surgeon to remove her tumour and decides to have a brain implant - that is, a segment of brain to fill the space in her brain created by the tumour removal. The segment is donated by another woman, Tracey. After the transplant, Isobella begins to take on characteristics of Tracey's personality. Isobella's boyfriend, Tarquin, is horrified by this. Isobella begins a slow but steady slide down the socio-economic ladder, losing her job and sitting around the flat all day. Tracey's trajectory is the opposite. She takes a job cleaning at a hospital, where she meets David, a nurse, who encourages her to study for a nursing diploma. Tracey lands a job as a nurse at a psychiatric hospital, which is where, in the final scene, she crosses paths with Isobella who has been dumped there by an exasperated Tarquin. David has, by this time, dumped Tracey, claiming that he loved her only because he was seeing the world through rose-tinted spectacles due to the anti-depressants he was on. The two women decide to become lesbian lovers.